Tag Archives: Jason Royle

#BookReview of The Rapture: Misunderstood by @JERoyle

the-rapture-misunderstoodThe Rapture: Misunderstood

by Jason E. Royle

Fiction/Non-Fiction: Spirituality/Christian/Eschatology/Religious Studies & Reference. 86 Pages Print. CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (June 30, 2016)

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Author Biography

Jason E. Royle holds a Doctorate in Ministry from Sewanee: University of the South School of Theology and is the author of Judas: Hero Misunderstood as well as Jesus vs. Santa: Christmas Misunderstood. Writing, for Jason, is a way to express the ongoingJudas Hero Misunderstood story of theology. With every book or article, he hopes readers get a sense of the complexity of God and the necessity of faith. Captivated by the spiritual component of life, Jason loves to read everything from the Greek classics to the Sunday comics. While serving as pastor of a congregation near Memphis, TN, Jason wrote a weekly column in a local newspaper called Sermon in a Nutshell and has had devotions published in The Secret Place, among others. Today he lives with his beautiful wife and children in Schaefferstown, PA, where he serves as the pastor of St. Paul’s United Church of Christ.

Book Review

The Rapture: Misunderstood is the third in Royle’s Misunderstood series, where he takes a well known aspect of Christianity and breaks it down into fact from fiction. This time around Royle divides the book into two parts; one a short story to help ease the reader into the subject and the second touches on some basic scripture and doctrine from four different views of the Rapture itself amongst the Christian community.

The opening story is about 53 pages long and tells the story of a pastor who wants to bring about the Rapture sooner than later. We follow him and his five followers on their journey to achieve their goal and learn along the way. At each step of the journey we learn a truth and then see the pastor make a decision. Ultimately the reward is in his grasp. What does he do next? What he does may surprise some, may not others, but ultimately we learn a lesson straight from the Bible itself.

After the story you get the views of four views on the end times based on the interpretation of scripture. Royle states from the beginning this is not an in depth look at end times prophecy, it would take more than the 23 pages given to it here. His goal to give you a good starting place and an understanding of where the four thoughts are coming from. He’s also quick to note many of us are not entirely one or the other view but instead a mix and match set. Royle’s style and approach has always been open and welcoming to his readers. He’s a good first step in any journey to discovery you may wish to take. He also provides a list of books at the end of the book to further your reading and understanding.

by: Ronovan Hester

Get The Rapture: Misunderstood and other Jason Royle books at:

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Connect with Jason Royle at:

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LitWorldInterviews.com-The Week-In Review. 11/9-11/14

BOOK REVIEWS

‘The Blue Crimes’ by Enrique Laso
by Olga Núñez Miret
Olga_Núñez_Miret_author.jpg

The Blue Crimes by Enrique Laso. An intriguing case and an even more intriguing investigator.

The Blue Crimes by Enrique Laso
The Blue Crimes by Enrique Laso

The Blue Crimes is the first book in Enrique Laso’s collection of Ethan Bush Thrillers. Ethan Bush is a young FBI agent, one of the most promising, top of his Psychology class at Stanford and self-assured, or so he seems. He arrives to Jefferson County fresh from solving a serial murder case in Detroit and expectations are running high. Read The Complete Review.
 
 
 
 


The Judas Apocalypse by Dan McNeil “At times his encounters are humorous, deadly, and explosive.”
by Ronovan Hester
Ron_LWI

McNeil gives us a story that spans two thousand years, not year by year or hanging out in that distant past for so long you want to skip pages, and that story threatens to devastate a world, a way of life, and rewrite history. And he does so by piecing together historical The Judas Apocalypse by Dan McNeilfacts with bits of legends and myths that are most familiar and some not so to the average layman. He brings some new twists to the saying “everything old is new again”.

There are times when you completely lose yourself in Dan McNeil’s world. You see and hear things. You feel remorse at times, even surprisingly for characters you can’t stand. McNeil makes you have emotions and thoughts, or perhaps maybe I should say he has you examine things about yourself at times that may make you wonder. Read The Complete Review.


 

Fort Applegate & The Battle of Wounded Knee by Brian Wu.
by Jason Royle
Judas Hero Misunderstood

Brian Wu’s approach to teaching children about the immune system in his book, Fort Applegate & The Battle of Wounded Knee, was informative and effective. As Wu Fort Applegate & The Battle of Wounded Kneestates in his opening “tips” section, Fort Applegate & The Battle of Wounded Kneeone of the primary goals in the writing of this book is for it to be used as a means of getting children interested in their immune system, and as a teaching tool. I found this to be true. Read The Complete Review.
 
 
 
 


FEATURE ARTICLES

Are You A Published Author? Then I Have A Question For You.
by Hugh Roberts
5c7f0fa5629d1be714bbc32bb9e48ddf

When Ronovan initially started Lit World Interviews, his idea was that it would be a place where authors could promote themselves as well as their work. It’s also a place where authors come to seek help and advice from others. Of course there’s the book reviews as well.

I don’t know about you, but I often find that my pride gets in the way when I want to ask for some help. That’s where blogs like this can really help because I don’t feel as afraid to ask for advice especially as many of the readers here are published authors. I am sure that all of them will have been in a similar situation to where I find myself today. Read The Complete Article and Comments.


Promoting Your Books on Amazon
by Jo Robinson
Jo Robinson Author

I’ve only just discovered, too late, that when you run a Kindle Countdown deal it either happens at Amazon.com or Amazon.UK, and not all regions at the same time. So while this time I’ve managed to put different books on Countdowns for the different regions, I’ll know better for next time.

The thing to do if you want your deal to be available to both regions is to set up two separate promotions for the same book on the same dates – one for UK and another for the USA. Read The Complete Article.

 

© Copyright-All rights reserved by LitWorldInterviews.com 2015

Lit World Interview Week In Review Apr. 13-18.

lit world interview with ronovan writes

Here are the articles for the week, if you missed one, go and check it out today.

FEATURES

What Does a Proofreader Actually Do With Your Book? by Wendy Janes

Some great reaction to this post. People have been shocked at what all a proofreader does.

Fiction Writers Can Write Great Non-Fiction Books Too by Jo Robinson

Do you need an explanation?

 

BOOK REVIEWS

Chaos Is Come Again by John Dolan and Fiona Quinn by Olga Núñez Miret

Olga knew about the writing process of the book before hand and went into the story wondering how it could work. Once in, she no longer cared about the process. Check out the review.

 

The Legacy of Fear by Vanessa A. Ryan by Ronovan

Vampires, mysteries, and Egyptian artifacts? What more do you need.

 

The Fictional Woman by @Tara_Moss by Florence Thum

People were surprised that after reading the review they now wanted to read the book themselves.

BOOK RELEASE NOTICES

Make some noise with a Thunderclap. For me and @PSBartlett

Our very own PS Bartlett has a book coming on Tuesday, April 14. The Thunderclap is for the 21st. Read the article to find out where I come into the picture. It’s free to help her out. Go do it. NOW! Oh, and she’s gone Indie, in case any of you hadn’t heard.

RONOVAN’S WHATEVER

Welcome @JERoyle Newest LWI Team Member.

Our newest member and a little about him.

 

It’s Thunderclap Time for Author @AlienoraTaylor

An author with a need. Part of our sister site Authors Supporting Authors efforts to help authors get noticed.

 

 Authors, be what authors need to be.

More of my thoughts about the future of Authors Supporting Authors and what Indie Authors need to do in order to be successful.

What can you expect next from the LWI Team?

Olga will likely have something great, as usual out Monday, as well as an interview by Colleen of Lisa Tetting of The Mistreatment of Zora Langston, which she reviewed here. You know Jo likely has something great coming up on Thursday. You have no idea what I might come up with, but be on the look out for authors needing help from https://authorssupportingauthors.wordpress.com/. What will the other team members have? Who knows? I don’t assign things or force anyone to write. I see things in the dashboard or get an email and go look.

If you are an author and have a guest post in mind, email me the idea at ronovanwrites@gmail.com. People love informative posts that help them with their careers and to make their novels better.

Follow us, Bookmark Us, do whatever you need to do in order to come back every day for something new. Share this post with your friends.

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Welcome @JERoyle Newest LWI Team Member.

Judas Hero Misunderstood

 

 

 

 

Blog: Jason Royle

Twitter: @JERoyle

Contact: JasonRoyle.net Contact Form on the Right side bar for Book Review Requests.

Who is Jason?

Author Bio: Jason serves as the pastor of St. Paul’s UCC in Schaefferstown, PA. He is a graduate of jason royleSewanee: University of the South School of Theology with a Doctorate in Ministry and Johnson University with a Master’s in Theology. He and his wife, Heather, have two children (Katelyn and Nate) and one loyal but lazy dog (Rudy). You can find his book, Judas: Misunderstood Hero on Amazon. Connect with Jason on his site, http://www.jasonroyle.net/ and on Twitter at .

Read more about her on his website, http://www.jasonroyle.net/.

Ronovan’s Take: Jason writes from where he believes in a way to help others understand truths not traditions. He and I agree a lot on these elements. Honest, trustworthy, and a great guy.

 

Why is Jason here?

I read Jason’s book at his request and enjoyed it greatly. A little spin on the idea of Judas that I actually agreed with in basic meaning. I felt LitWorldInterviews needed to branch out to the spiritual and faith areas of books and Jason, after my interview with him that is here on LWI, I knew I had found the person. Non-judgemental, likes to hear other people’s ideas, a teacher and a learner at the same time.

What does Jason do here?

Jason writes Features and Book Reviews.  If you want him to review a book please contact him through his contact form on his site.

Remember to check out his book on Amazon, Judas: Hero Misunderstood. It’s only .99 and worth it. A somewhat quirky read about the trial of Judas.

 

Lit World Interview Week In Review Apr. 6-10.

lit world interview with ronovan writes

Here are the articles for the week, if you missed one, go and check it out today.

Author Interview with Ronovan Writes

I Love Anger the truth by @isaacdrowe The interview.

I read the book and asked the questions. It’s the real thing form the real guy. Isaac doesn’t sugar coat life in order to make things pretty for people wanting to find a way to a better place. You have to go through ugly to get out of ugly.

FEATURES

Publishing Your First Book on Amazon for New Indies by @JoRobinson176 by Jo Robinson

Great advice for formatting your book for Amazon. Seriously. There are some things you likely didn’t think of. She even includes images to help walk you through the steps.

Paid book promotions and other ideas to sell your book. The feedback. by Olga Núñez Miret

Olga got feedback from authors about where to and how to promote your book. If you missed it, it’s a MUST READ.

 

New Site: AuthorsSupportingAuthor by Ronovan

I just created a new site last week, more details soon. This is a sister site to LWI. ASA is just as the name says, Authors Supporting Authors.

A Diary of Writing Wisdom (and other nonsense) by Jason Royle

New Team Member, Jason Royle brings us his first article. It’s published under my name only because he had an emergency he had to take care of. Fortunately he had emailed me the article and the image to use. Nice responses for our new kid on the block. His wife took his picture, just so you know. And picked out his clothes to wear. Make sure to check out his profile in the Black Box on the left with the white text.

 

 

BOOK REVIEWS

Sword of Air by RJ Madigan by Florence Thum

We were asked to review this YA book, primarily because of its new format. It’s a multi-touch iBook. Not only did Florence review the book, but her children tried it as well. Read the results. (Too bad I couldn’t make it work for me, but I knew Florence would have an i Something. Well actually her son did. Hey, we get the job done, right?)

BOOK RELEASE NOTICES

Make some noise with a Thunderclap. For me and @PSBartlett

Our very own PS Bartlett has a book coming on Tuesday, April 14. The Thunderclap is for the 21st. Read the article to find out where I come into the picture. It’s free to help her out. Go do it. NOW! Oh, and she’s gone Indie, in case any of you hadn’t heard.

RONOVAN’S WHATEVER

Hear the author of Order of Seven @beth_teliho with @MandiCLBT

A great find this week. Many of you probably know Beth Teliho, well go listen to her. And you get to hear how to say her name the RIGHT way.

 

What can you expect next from the LWI Team?

It’s Monday, so Olga has a Book Review, likely out by the time you read this. On Mondahy I have a great post from our very popular Guest Author Wendy Janes. It is the first of three that will be put out the second Monday of each month starting this month. I’ve heard that Florence has a Book Review for us. You know Jo likely has something great coming up on Thursday. As for me? You never know  what I might do, but expect a formal introduction of our new Team Member Jason Royle, and further details about https://authorssupportingauthors.wordpress.com/. I can say this, our first go at getting some results worked.

Be on the look out for interviews coming from the other LWI team members. That’s right, due to illness and recovery time being indeterminate I’ve had to step back a little in some areas. If you haven’t wanted to approach me for an interview, you now might approach another person you might be more comfortable with. Also, with my amnesia and short term memory problems I’m having difficulties keeping some things straight. I love this site, but it’s not my site, it’s every author’s site.

Follow us, Bookmark Us, do whatever you need to do in order to come back every day for something new. Share this post with your friends.

lit world interviews

 

A Diary of Writing Wisdom (and other nonsense) by new LWI Team Member @JERoyle

#1

Newer Doesn’t Always Mean Better

In all areas of life—and reading and writing is no exception—there is a psychological pressure to accept the current edition/the newest “thing-a-ma-jig” as the superior.

The argument of “newer-is-better” assumes that a modern idea should be preferred to an ancient one simply because it is modern. This way of thinking has a long history, going back at least to the Athenians of the Apostle Paul’s day who “liked to spend all their time telling and hearing the latest new thing” (Acts 17:21).

Jason Royle Photo at History Museum in DC.
Jason Royle Photo from History Museum in DC.

The pressure to keep up-to-date is stronger now than it has ever been. The results of this pressure can be seen all around us. Take the clothing industry for example. The stores today do not sell “clothes” (they do, I know, in a sense, but stick with me and let me make my point). No, they sell “fashions.” Back when they sold clothes, the fabric was durable and designed to last for years. But fashions change from year to year and from season to season.

One resource I find myself still using on a regular basis is John Bartlett’s book Bartlett’s Familiar Quotations, first published in 1855. All of the quotes in the book you can probably find online somewhere, but what you won’t find is the underlined, smudged, musty smelling pages of my old friend. There is something beautiful about something old. Timeworn with dignity (as the saying goes; actually I’m not certain that is really an old saying, but it sounds good).

All the old books on our shelves speak to us: “Look how useful I have been,” they say. When it comes to literature, they don’t call them “classics” for nothing! They’re classic because the information contained within them has stood the test of time.

I imagine every author will come face to face with the harsh reality that “newer doesn’t always mean better” at some point in their life. Especially after the years have gone by and one day we hand to one of our grandchildren the book we wrote way back in 2010, and hope they take the time to read it and not simply put it on the shelf to collect dust. And why would they do something like that to one of grandma and grandpa’s books they wrote? Well… it’s not new anymore.      

 

Judas Hero MisunderstoodJason serves as the pastor of St. Paul’s UCC in Schaefferstown, PA. He is a graduate of Sewanee: University of the South School of Theology with a Doctorate in Ministry and Johnson University with a Master’s in Theology. He and his wife, Heather, have two children (Katelyn and Nate) and one loyal but lazy dog (Rudy). You can find his book, Judas: Hero Misunderstood on Amazon. Connect with Jason on his site, http://www.jasonroyle.net/ and on Twitter at .

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© Copyright-All rights reserved by litworldinteriews.wordpress.com 2015

 

 

Judas: Hero Misunderstood Q&A @JERoyle

 

judas-hero-misunderstood-jason-royle

“We all have to some degree “Judas” within us. [Jason Royle] provides a perspective I have never considered. I highly recommend this book.”~Amazon Review

RW: Jason, first of all, what is the title of your book and in one sentence tell me why I should read this book.

JASON: Judas: Hero Misunderstood. There’s more to Judas’ story than meets the eye.Jason Royle

RW: This isn’t the first book with a different take on the man Judas from the Bible. I can see what makes it a bit unique from other works but in your own words what makes your book different?

JASON: It’s entertaining! For those who haven’t read the book, my answer probably sounds like a copout. But go trudge through some of the others and you will see. What you will get is in depth Greek analysis and excruciating exegesis. In comparison, mine is an entertainment for the main course and a little food for thought for dessert. Or, as one my friends put it: a parody with possibility.       

RW: I think entertaining is a good word to use. It’s not a preachy seminary required reading type of thing. And you get it and it stays with you because of it. Now, why Judas, why did you decide to share this particular story with the world?

JASON: Because I root for the underdog. Before ordained ministry I was a Social Worker. I guess it’s in my blood. I have always had a tendency to root for the little guy; to help those unable to help themselves. What bigger underdog is there than Judas?

RW: He definitely would be considered an underdog for sure. How did you go about developing the way you tell the story? I mean, you don’t do it in a first century sort of way.

JASON: Ron, believe it or not, my inspiration actually came from a home bible study encounter in Indian Trail, NC about fifteen years ago. John (a good friend of mine) and I were talking about the lesson which included the text in John’s gospel where it says, “Satan entered into him,” (referring to Judas). That’s when John said to me, “It doesn’t seem fair, does it?” I have been pondering that comment ever since. The story developed by asking the right question: How do I turn the dining room table without scratching the wood floor? Do I just pick it up, turn it around and slam it down, or move it subtly, gently, so not to wake up the kids but still get the job done.

“I would like to commend [Jason Royle] on a book well written and extremely interesting.
It was short and to the point (60 pages). I read it in less than an hour….definitely my type of book. I look forward to reading it again…probably 30-45 minutes of pure enjoyment this time. There is much food for thought in this short story. I am not a biblical scholar, so I can’t say for sure if any other writer has portrayed Judas as a hero. For me it was very original.
I have a suggestion for [Jason Royle]. Don’t stop with Judas. Write about some other biblical characters. I’m sure many of them were misunderstood just like Judas.”~Amazon Review 

RW: Tell us why you particularly are the one to tell this story.

JASON: If you’re asking about credentials, my Bachelor’s is in Social Work and my Master’s and Doctorate are in Theology.

RW: I like to see people’s answer to that without my being specific about it. It gives me an idea of them and how they think. Jason, who is Jason Royle?

JASON: Jason is a student of life, just like everyone else.

RW: What is Jason Royle?

JASON: Jason is someone who tries. In fact, that’s what I want on my tombstone someday, “He tried.” It leaves a lot of room for interpretation, I know, but stagnation is worse.

RW: I get it. Try is all we’re asked to do. Excellent idea. What’s been the reaction to your take on the story of Judas?

JASON: I have heard from young readers and older readers; liberal minded and conservative prone; college students and Sunday school teachers. All have had a similar reaction: surprised. Surprised because it wasn’t what they expected, in a good way. Reading it was enjoyable. They learned something while being entertained at the same time.

“The book makes a credible appeal to reconsider how we view Judas today, whether Satan made him betray Jesus, or if he was just the unfortunate disciple destined to commit an act that would cause his name to be reviled through the ages. The author promised that the book would not be a complex theological analysis of Judas and his actions, and I found that to be true. It was easy, interesting reading.”~Amazon Review

RW: Why do you think the story of Judas is one that, well, that I see as one not really talked about so much other than his one act that night? Virtually every part of the New Testament is looked at from so many angles and discussed but when it comes to Judas, not so much.

JASON: Good point there, Ron, virtually every character of the Bible has been put on the operating table to be examined and reexamined—except Judas. As for why he is not talked about, the reasons are many. From a pure literary standpoint, the Bible is written in the form of a comedy. Not the ha-ha-he-he funny category, but a U shaped story, a comic plot that descends into potential tragedy and then rises to a happy ending. Judas is commonly viewed as an obstacle in Jesus’ story. But was he really an obstacle? Instead of thinking of him as an obstacle, in my book I take the approach that the story had to have a happy ending, therefore Judas is an assistant to rather than a deterrent of, the ending God desires.  

From a psychological standpoint, we are faced with altering our theological decisions; the one’s we’ve made up in our minds; the one’s the majority agree with; the one’s our friends and parents told us were true. To reconfigure our longstanding theological constructs we have to do something we don’t like to do: move out of our theological comfort zone.

RW: That sounds similar to some thoughts I have about traditions as opposed to actual Biblical truths. Very good points. Tell us about where you grew up and how if in any way that helped shape the way you look at the world and perhaps the Bible.

JASON: Well, Ron, my father was a preacher. I’m a PK, as the saying goes (preacher’s kid), born and raised in southern Illinois. My parents helped shape my theology and my outlook on life, as do all parents. When I went away to college in KY at the age of twenty, that’s when my theology was reshaped; it became mine for the first time.    

RW: Your book isn’t a humdrum read. It combines very elements to tell a somewhat unique story. I say that to not give away anything. Man it’s difficult not giving away things about this book. Looking at your writing, who has influenced you as a writer, in your style, your approach?

JASON: That’s not an easy one, Ron, there are so many. I guess one of my earliest influences would be C. S. Lewis. Not his heady stuff, but his creative stuff like, The Screwtape Letters, The Pilgrim’s Regress and Till We Have Faces.  

RW: Your book Judas: Hero Misunderstood was awarded Indie Book of the day recently. How did that come about and what did it feel like to receive that honor? For a book with such a religious theme, although not what I would call preachy, that is an accomplishment I would think.

JASON: There was no fee involved; I just submitted my book for consideration. When I got the email saying it had been selected it made my day. But what has got me even more excited is that I just found out I am a finalist in a pretty prestigious contest: The Eric Hoffer Award. My book is a finalist for The da Vinci Eye, and still in the running for a category prize.

RW: Very awesome awards there. With that kind of reaction and the reaction from the readers when can we expect the next book from you and what will it be about?

JASON: I have two in the pipeline now in The Misunderstood Series. The next one will be out this spring, Jesus vs. Santa: Christmas Misunderstood, and then in the summer, hopefully, The Rapture Misunderstood. For Jesus vs. Santa I hired and illustrator for a section of cartoon drawings that will be a feature of the book depicting funny comparisons between the two. For example, Jesus stands at the door and knocks vs. Santa just comes on in uninvited is comically illustrated. I like to think of the theme of the book as, “The Far Side” meets “Deepak Chopra.”

RW: We’ve discussed the books and now to the important things, did your wife help pick out the cool frames for your glasses in your Author Bio photo? I mean are you the Judas Hero Misunderstoodfashionista in the family?

JASON: I’ll be turning forty-five next week. Thanks to my wife’s fashionable insights, she is helping me at least look younger.

RW: I knew it! It had to be her! To hip and daring to have been from a guy. Well not necessarily but I just had this feeling. If you’re like me you would be, can I see through them? Cool, I’ll buy them. Describe your writing space for us?

JASON: I live in a 1870s church parsonage in a small town in Lebanon County PA, approximately 20 miles east of Hershey, PA and 20 miles north of Lancaster, PA. Our front porch has two front doors, one for the pastor’s office and one for the house. I use a standing desk and sit behind an antique wooden desk,Jason Royle not in a chair, but on a large Gold’s Gym rubber body ball (to help strengthen my back). On the wall beside my inlaid bookshelf hangs my most treasured diploma: my Kindergarten diploma in a plain black frame.

RW: Wow. I don’t normally use that word in an interview because it’s just not professional but that just sounds like an awesome atmosphere to write in. What is your favorite word? How did it become your favorite word?

JASON: Curiosity. It’s what led me to where I am today. I’ve always been the one to ask, “Why?” when no one else would. I used to drive my professor’s crazy. There’s no harm in asking, my mom would always say. So, I asked… and asked.

RW: Great answer. It’s something I actually live by as well. What do you do to relax and get away from stress, from the stress of a writing session that is just frustrating you?

JASON: I have an old school duct taped punching bag in a spare room upstairs I like to make use of. On a nice day, a round of golf, but that can sometimes just add to the frustration too.  

RW: Oh, man, you are so write about golf. I need to tell you about my father, my following his instructions to the letter, his follow-through and my forehead someday. What is your favorite autobiography and why?

JASON: St. Augustine’s Confessions. In the Confessions there is the young Augustine who struggles with his spiritual plight, and then there is the older Augustine who looks back over his shoulder to discover there was a path all along, he just didn’t see it before. Something I can certainly relate to. If I had to Jason Royleguess, probably something everyone can relate to.

RW: Nice. I like Just As I Am by Billy Graham for the exact same reasons. What is your favorite beverage and why?

JASON: Coffee. I wouldn’t have made it through college without it, nor had the stamina to stay up into the wee hours in the morning writing this book after our kids go to sleep.

Jason RoyleRW: What is your peaceful place?

JASON: Sitting on the front porch with my wife or one of my kids in the evening watching the Amish go by in their buggies.

RW: I am so jealous of that. History rolling by in the present. Amazing. Yes, the old History teacher in me is geeking a touch here. Jason, what defines you as you?

JASON: Everything and nothing.

 

You can connect with author Jason Royle through Twitter or his blog: www.jasonroyle.net

And Judas: Hero Misunderstood is at Amazon, here.

When Jason contacted me about his book and I saw the story idea I cringed. You see it’s a story I’ve told to youth groups, my son, and others through the years. And I was afraid it would be a poorly done ‘preachy’ piece. But, I went ahead and got the book, I had $.99 left in gift money on my Amazon account, I’m broke now, just so everyone knows. But I bought the book and decided to give it a shot. I read it in one sitting and was happy I did because It does take a different path than what I have seen before. And it makes sense to the point it will stay with you. I look forward to his other Misunderstood books when they come out and I have more money if anyone ever gifts money to me again. Still not certain how or why that happened, but I didn’t complain.

“Firstly, the more you read this book the better this book gets. The first chapter seemed a tad slow, the second chapter got better, by the third chapter I was hooked.”~Amazon Review

Read my Amazon Review here and hopefully click it helped you.

Buy Judas: Hero Misunderstood today.

 

Bio Back of Book Version:

Jason is the pastor of St. Paul’s United Church of Christ in Schaefferstown, Pennsylvania. A Social Judas Hero MisunderstoodWorker before his call to full-time ministry, Jason received his Doctorate in Ministry from Sewanee: University of the South School of Theology and his Master’s from Johnson University. He and his wife, Heather, have two children (Katelyn and Nate) and one loyal but lazy dog (Rudy).


 

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Judas: Hero Misunderstood by @JERoyle

Jason Royle

Title: Judas: Hero Misunderstood
Author: Jason Royle
Paperback: 60 pages
Print Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (August 18, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500884200
ISBN-13: 978-1500884208
File Size: 2035 KB
Print Length: 62 pages
Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
Kindle Publisher: Jason E. Royle; 1 edition (August 17, 2014)
Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
ASIN: B00MTCDRG6
Text-to-Speech: Enabled
X-Ray: Not Enabled
Word Wise: Not Enabled
Lending: Enabled

 

Judas: Hero Misunderstood is the story of a man out of history that is perhaps the least known about but one of the most significant disciples during the actual life of Jesus and what happened after that night in the garden, after the Judas kiss.

Jason Royle takes the reader on a journey of what if. Or maybe it really is a journey of what did happen. The style he chose to use is contemporary in the use of language and symbolism in order for anyone today to relate and connect to the story. Unlike many other takes that are similar to what Royle has done you don’t get a preachy style. At the very end, after the story is all done and over with, you receive a look at passages from the Bible to show you what may or may not bring credence to what Royle has written.

The story itself is a journey of what happens after Jesus has been taken away, what thoughts go through the mind of Judas, and what happens after his death. Where does he go? Who does he see? We see Judas, just like all others according to the Christian faith, answering for what he has done.

The manner in which Royle chose to do this is very interesting and relatable to today and I found the use of gender at times a surprise. For the Bible Belt the book should be something that doesn’t threaten what they believe, as if one studies their Bible perhaps they might come to similar conclusions as the author has for this book, or at list not so far off as to be offended.

The story is told to educate but in a ‘what if’ kind of manner. It is meant to get the reader to thinking.

I would recommend this book to anyone really. It’s an easy and quick read. I read it in one sitting and had little problem with flow or pace. I wanted to continue on. The beginning chapter or two were a little bit, I’m not certain if confusing it the right word. What the author wrote had to be written in order to set the stage for what was to come next, to get to what would really get us in the learning mode. The author had no idea I had agreed to review the book so there was no reason I had to read it as quickly as I did, it was simply that type of book. You just don’t realize you’ve done it.

Review Rating

1 being I would almost rather die than read the book and 5 being a superior book that truly excels to perfection.Judas Hero Misunderstood

Character Believability: 4
Flow and Pace: 4
Reader Engagement: 4
Reader Enrichment: 4
Reader Enjoyment: 4.5
Overall Rate: 4.1

Bio Back of Book Version:

Jason is the pastor of St. Paul’s United Church of Christ in Schaefferstown, Pennsylvania. A Social Worker before his call to full-time ministry, Jason received his Doctorate in Ministry from Sewanee: University of the South School of Theology and his Master’s from Johnson University. He and his wife, Heather, have two children (Katelyn and Nate) and one loyal but lazy dog (Rudy).

Ron_LWI

 

 

 

 

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