Tag Archives: Judas: Hero Misunderstood

Welcome @JERoyle Newest LWI Team Member.

Judas Hero Misunderstood

 

 

 

 

Blog: Jason Royle

Twitter: @JERoyle

Contact: JasonRoyle.net Contact Form on the Right side bar for Book Review Requests.

Who is Jason?

Author Bio: Jason serves as the pastor of St. Paul’s UCC in Schaefferstown, PA. He is a graduate of jason royleSewanee: University of the South School of Theology with a Doctorate in Ministry and Johnson University with a Master’s in Theology. He and his wife, Heather, have two children (Katelyn and Nate) and one loyal but lazy dog (Rudy). You can find his book, Judas: Misunderstood Hero on Amazon. Connect with Jason on his site, http://www.jasonroyle.net/ and on Twitter at .

Read more about her on his website, http://www.jasonroyle.net/.

Ronovan’s Take: Jason writes from where he believes in a way to help others understand truths not traditions. He and I agree a lot on these elements. Honest, trustworthy, and a great guy.

 

Why is Jason here?

I read Jason’s book at his request and enjoyed it greatly. A little spin on the idea of Judas that I actually agreed with in basic meaning. I felt LitWorldInterviews needed to branch out to the spiritual and faith areas of books and Jason, after my interview with him that is here on LWI, I knew I had found the person. Non-judgemental, likes to hear other people’s ideas, a teacher and a learner at the same time.

What does Jason do here?

Jason writes Features and Book Reviews.  If you want him to review a book please contact him through his contact form on his site.

Remember to check out his book on Amazon, Judas: Hero Misunderstood. It’s only .99 and worth it. A somewhat quirky read about the trial of Judas.

 

A Diary of Writing Wisdom (and other nonsense) by new LWI Team Member @JERoyle

#1

Newer Doesn’t Always Mean Better

In all areas of life—and reading and writing is no exception—there is a psychological pressure to accept the current edition/the newest “thing-a-ma-jig” as the superior.

The argument of “newer-is-better” assumes that a modern idea should be preferred to an ancient one simply because it is modern. This way of thinking has a long history, going back at least to the Athenians of the Apostle Paul’s day who “liked to spend all their time telling and hearing the latest new thing” (Acts 17:21).

Jason Royle Photo at History Museum in DC.
Jason Royle Photo from History Museum in DC.

The pressure to keep up-to-date is stronger now than it has ever been. The results of this pressure can be seen all around us. Take the clothing industry for example. The stores today do not sell “clothes” (they do, I know, in a sense, but stick with me and let me make my point). No, they sell “fashions.” Back when they sold clothes, the fabric was durable and designed to last for years. But fashions change from year to year and from season to season.

One resource I find myself still using on a regular basis is John Bartlett’s book Bartlett’s Familiar Quotations, first published in 1855. All of the quotes in the book you can probably find online somewhere, but what you won’t find is the underlined, smudged, musty smelling pages of my old friend. There is something beautiful about something old. Timeworn with dignity (as the saying goes; actually I’m not certain that is really an old saying, but it sounds good).

All the old books on our shelves speak to us: “Look how useful I have been,” they say. When it comes to literature, they don’t call them “classics” for nothing! They’re classic because the information contained within them has stood the test of time.

I imagine every author will come face to face with the harsh reality that “newer doesn’t always mean better” at some point in their life. Especially after the years have gone by and one day we hand to one of our grandchildren the book we wrote way back in 2010, and hope they take the time to read it and not simply put it on the shelf to collect dust. And why would they do something like that to one of grandma and grandpa’s books they wrote? Well… it’s not new anymore.      

 

Judas Hero MisunderstoodJason serves as the pastor of St. Paul’s UCC in Schaefferstown, PA. He is a graduate of Sewanee: University of the South School of Theology with a Doctorate in Ministry and Johnson University with a Master’s in Theology. He and his wife, Heather, have two children (Katelyn and Nate) and one loyal but lazy dog (Rudy). You can find his book, Judas: Hero Misunderstood on Amazon. Connect with Jason on his site, http://www.jasonroyle.net/ and on Twitter at .

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Judas: Hero Misunderstood by @JERoyle

Jason Royle

Title: Judas: Hero Misunderstood
Author: Jason Royle
Paperback: 60 pages
Print Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (August 18, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500884200
ISBN-13: 978-1500884208
File Size: 2035 KB
Print Length: 62 pages
Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
Kindle Publisher: Jason E. Royle; 1 edition (August 17, 2014)
Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
ASIN: B00MTCDRG6
Text-to-Speech: Enabled
X-Ray: Not Enabled
Word Wise: Not Enabled
Lending: Enabled

 

Judas: Hero Misunderstood is the story of a man out of history that is perhaps the least known about but one of the most significant disciples during the actual life of Jesus and what happened after that night in the garden, after the Judas kiss.

Jason Royle takes the reader on a journey of what if. Or maybe it really is a journey of what did happen. The style he chose to use is contemporary in the use of language and symbolism in order for anyone today to relate and connect to the story. Unlike many other takes that are similar to what Royle has done you don’t get a preachy style. At the very end, after the story is all done and over with, you receive a look at passages from the Bible to show you what may or may not bring credence to what Royle has written.

The story itself is a journey of what happens after Jesus has been taken away, what thoughts go through the mind of Judas, and what happens after his death. Where does he go? Who does he see? We see Judas, just like all others according to the Christian faith, answering for what he has done.

The manner in which Royle chose to do this is very interesting and relatable to today and I found the use of gender at times a surprise. For the Bible Belt the book should be something that doesn’t threaten what they believe, as if one studies their Bible perhaps they might come to similar conclusions as the author has for this book, or at list not so far off as to be offended.

The story is told to educate but in a ‘what if’ kind of manner. It is meant to get the reader to thinking.

I would recommend this book to anyone really. It’s an easy and quick read. I read it in one sitting and had little problem with flow or pace. I wanted to continue on. The beginning chapter or two were a little bit, I’m not certain if confusing it the right word. What the author wrote had to be written in order to set the stage for what was to come next, to get to what would really get us in the learning mode. The author had no idea I had agreed to review the book so there was no reason I had to read it as quickly as I did, it was simply that type of book. You just don’t realize you’ve done it.

Review Rating

1 being I would almost rather die than read the book and 5 being a superior book that truly excels to perfection.Judas Hero Misunderstood

Character Believability: 4
Flow and Pace: 4
Reader Engagement: 4
Reader Enrichment: 4
Reader Enjoyment: 4.5
Overall Rate: 4.1

Bio Back of Book Version:

Jason is the pastor of St. Paul’s United Church of Christ in Schaefferstown, Pennsylvania. A Social Worker before his call to full-time ministry, Jason received his Doctorate in Ministry from Sewanee: University of the South School of Theology and his Master’s from Johnson University. He and his wife, Heather, have two children (Katelyn and Nate) and one loyal but lazy dog (Rudy).

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