Tag Archives: Short Stories

#Bookreview and #mini-interview ‘what if I got down on my knees’ by Tony Rauch. For readers who enjoy short-stories, love language and the unusual.

what if I got down on my knees by Tony Rauch
what if I got down on my knees by Tony Rauch

Sorry I haven’t been around much recently, but today I bring you a review and the author, Tony Rauch, has also agreed to answer a few questions, so we have a double feature, a review and a mini-interview.

Title:   what if I got down on my knees
Author:   Tony Rauch
ISBN:  098293355X

ISBN13:  978-0982933558
ASIN:  B00YNR6HBM
Published:  Whistling Shade Press; 1 edition (May 31, 2015)
Pages:  189
Genre:  Literary Fiction/Short stories

Description:

what if i got down on my knees? presents romantic misadventures and entanglements of absurd, whimsical, existential longing, featuring discovery, secrets, identity, escape, strange happenings, endurance, regret, and hope. The stories are little postcards from the lonely regions of the human heart.

These tales of wonder are about people trying to find meaning and a place in an indifferent world, and their discoveries, revelations, secrets, failures, struggles, connections, and odd encounters along the way—

—two unemployed men steal dogs and run them through buildings around town.
—a man goes on what turns into the worst date in recorded history.
—you are asked to baby-sit for a neighbor, only to find a giant baby waiting for you.
—a man comes home to find his entire yard and home paved over by a long lost rival.
—a clerk at a used record store finds a man has passed away on one of the couches.
—some young adults go into the basement to get sad, in order to impress girls.
—a stranger extracts a baby from a man waiting for the bus.

With themes of longing, fragility, uncertainty, impermanence, regret, the mysteries hidden in everyday life, discovery, ennui, loneliness, irresponsible behavior, confusion, change, identity, and absurd situations, Tony Rauch is a worthy successor to the artistry and absurdism of Donald Barthelme and Steve Martin.

 Body of review:

I received a copy of this novel from the author and I voluntarily review it for Lit World Interviews.

Short stories are an acquired taste. We might think a short read is perfect because we are always rushing and don’t have a lot of time, but sometimes we might feel disappointed when the story ends and we’ve invested time and, in the best of cases, emotions only to have to get to know some new characters after a few pages. Of course, not all short stories are born equal. And this collection of short stories by Tony Rauch proves the point.

Some of the short stories in this collection are whimsical (surreal) and might leave you scratching your head (or looking up to the sky searching for… No spoilers) , some are vignettes illustrating the lives of people who might appear content with their lives at a superficial level, but whose thoughts and worries run deeper than it seems, many are about lonely people wondering about others and trying to connect (in some occasions with hilarious consequences), some are about pretending to be something or somebody else, about growing up, about growing old, about moving on or remembering the past…

The quality of the writing is superb, and the first person narratives cleverly capture the speech and rhythms of the characters, who sometimes are talking to others, sometimes conducting an internal monologue with themselves, or even writing a story. From young kids trying to impress their friends to old men dying, from people contemplating a new relationship to others letting go, these few pages run the whole gamut of experiences and emotions.

To give you some examples:

His skin appeared two sizes too tight for his body, stiff and washed out, like he’d gotten it secondhand, or found it in an alley late at night.

His suit is mythical—straight, lean, long, pure, giving, musical, thoughtful, caring, dynamic, cosmopolitan, unselfish, strong, industrious, and nostalgic for his mother, her peanut butter cookies, and snowy Christmas mornings.

“And what would someone do with a dream of mine? Where would you keep it?”

“I’d stretch it out to create a sail, and then use it to float off to who knows where,” I advise.

 Some of the stories are nostalgic and melancholy, but there are great comedic moments, ranging from slapstick to joyful turns of phrase (and oh, a so very satisfying revenge story).  Another example I highlighted:

Eventually, he turned up in over 3000 cans of a popular brand of tuna. A horrible fate to be sure, and amplified by the fact that the guy was notoriously reputed to detest tuna.

I won’t tell you which stories I liked the most as I’d find it difficult. I checked the reviews, and on reading the comments when the reviewers mentioned a story or another I’d agree with them. So… Just go and read them and enjoy their variety.

 What the book is about: Many things: growing up, life, dreams, realities, loneliness, relationships, friendship, revenge, writing…

 Book Highlights: The quality of the writing and the very distinct characters and voices. The whimsical sense of humour.

 Challenges of the book: Sometimes with the electronic version I wasn’t clear when I had moved from one story to another. The titles of the individual stories and the different parts weren’t always easy to tell apart.

Although the book is not long, I think it is best taken slowly and savouring the quality of the writing, rather than rushing to get to the end of the story. It is not a book to be read in a hurry.

 What do you get from it: Beautiful writing, stories that make you think and a few laughs.

 What I would have changed if anything: As I mentioned perhaps change the size of the titles or the formatting (in the digital version) to make the divisions clearer.

 Who Would I recommend this book to?: To readers who enjoy language and a mood more than heavily plotted stories (although there are some great ones too). And to writers who are considering writing short stories, or just keen on exploring the many ways characterization works.

Ratings:
Realistic Characterization: 4.5/5
Made Me Think: 4/5
Overall enjoyment: 4.5/5
Readability: 4/5
Recommended: 5/5
Overall Rating: 4.5/5
 

Buy it at:  
Format & Pricing:
Paperback:  $12 

Kindle: $3.22 

Author Tony Rauch
Author Tony Rauch

And now, I asked a few questions to the author:

People have less and less time these days and short forms of writing are becoming more and more popular. From flash-fiction to microfiction and even stories told in Tweets, it’s all about brevity. Of course, the short story has a long tradition, but what is for you a short story? And what makes it (so far) your preferred choice when writing? –

For me a short story is anything that conveys a feeling, or an event, or that sets up an event that may then spring forward. It does not have to have a beginning or an ending. I like story starters, that is a written piece that poses a situation or premise, and then you have to imagine various outcomes. But the premise is so interesting it creates that zing in your brain and gets you thinking. That to me is a good story: anything that kick-starts that zing in your imagination and gets you thinking on a different track or about various possibilities.

I prefer the short form because I don’t need a lot of useless background info that longer work sometimes gets bogged down in. I don’t have a lot of free time, so the short form is good for getting ideas down. I have a lot of different ideas, so the short form works well in sorting them into more organized paradigms.

Tony Rauch in action
Tony Rauch in action

Who are your favourite writers, in general, and writers of short stories (if they aren’t the same ones)? Why? What have you learned from them? –

Favorite authors, influences: Anyone interesting, imaginative, and concise. Anyone who makes you think.

Mostly I like short stories as they get to the point quickly. The books that really inspired me are mostly imaginative story collections because they were exciting and new and you never knew what was going to happen next in them. Also, they were brief, which made them memorable and easily digestible.

I like strange or absurd adventures that are well crafted and have a meaning to them, and sci fi as it offers ideas. Reading these types of writers is like taking mini adventures that I could not experience otherwise in the limitations of my actual life –

Older writers:

Donald Barthelme, J.D. Salinger, Richard Brautigan, Kurt Vonnegut, Jr., Charles Bukowski, Leonard Michaels (murderers), Mark Twain, James Thurber, Antoine de Saint Exupery (the little prince), Dr. Seuss (cool illustrations), Roald Dahl, Steve Martin (cruel shoes), W.P. Kinsella (the alligator report), Jim Heynen (the man who kept cigars in his cap), Don Delillo.

Contemporary writers:

Barry Yourgrau, Mark Leyner, Adrienne Clasky (from the floodlands), Lydia Davis (Samuel Johnson is indignant), Etgar Keret, Stacey Richter, George Singleton, James Tate (Return to the city of white donkeys), Thom Jones, Italo Calvino, Stephen-Paul Martin, Will Self, Denis Johnson (Jesus’ son), David Gilbert (I shot the hairdresser), David Sedaris, Paul Di Filippo, D. Harlan Wilson, Andersen Prunty.

Science fiction from the 40s, 50s, and 60s:

Rod Serling, L. Sprague De Camp, Ray Bradbury, Phillip K. Dick, Aurthur C. Clarke, Isaac Asimov, Charles Beaumont, Ursula K. Le Guin, Douglas Adams (an 80’s writer), etc.

Author Tony Rauch trying to grab the intangible
Author Tony Rauch trying to grab the intangible

Many writers read this blog. I subscribe to the advice that one should read in order to improve one’s writing. I know it will be a difficult choice, but any stories in particular that have had an impact on you or have increased your understanding of the form? 

Yes, many – see the list of authors above. One thing I look for is that buzz or zing when they convey a feeling or present something I hadn’t ever seen before. For example, I like that F. Scott Fitzgerald story “Winter dreams” because in it the character changes, or his feelings for someone changes. I like that arc, that sense of change the character goes through in a story. That story presents a loss, and the character’s feelings about that change and loss.

Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

Yes, it is:  https://trauch.wordpress.com/

You can find book information and story samples on that bad boy of rock and roll.

If you know of any good publishers looking for arty story collections, please let them know about me. I’m always looking for good publishers. A lot of places don’t publish single author story collections.

Thank you for your time.

Thanks very much to Tony Rauch for his book and for answering my questions, thanks to you  for reading, and don’t forget to like, share, comment, and CLICK!

Olga Núñez Miret

@OlgaNM7

http://www.authortranslatorolga.com

 

 

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Crave For Me by @RebeccahChase. #BookReview

Crave for me by Rebecca Chase Image with link3 Gold Stars image

 

Crave For Me

by Rebecca Chase

Fiction: Erotica/Romance.  Says 139 Pages but my Kindle has it at 274 pages. Amazon Digital Services LLC (February 21, 2016) $2.99 or Free to Read on KindleUnlimited.

Author Biography

Rebecca Chase is an English rose with a taste for sex and romance.

Starting life as a superhero she found she liked stockings more than tights so writing erotic romance was the obvious next step. When she’s not busy going on amusing and passionate dates with sexy suitors, or whacking shuttle cocks in thrilling badminton games, she dances the night away in random clubs. Frequently she can be found enjoying the spectacle of rugby men battling with balls. Rebecca loves finding interesting story ideas in everyday life and can frequently be caught daydreaming in coffee shops, while trying to hide her writing from sneaky-eyed baristas.

Book Review

I received this book for an honest review.

Although books of the more erotic nature are not my usual cup of tea, I agree to read some books at times because I feel every author needs reviewed, even if not by me. I had the time for this one, with it being three short stories, so I agreed.

The three stories in the book, Crave For Me: three short tales of erotic romance, are Fight For Me, Work For Me, and Play For Me.

The first, Fight For Me finds two childhood friends reunited over a brother’s wedding. But more is going on inside each than the other knows. Juliet Scott has been in love with Joe Adams since she knew boys weren’t all that bad after all. He’s been gone in the Army but her desire hasn’t lessened for the bad boy she knew. What happens when the old friend who thinks of her as a baby sister comes home on leave?

This is the right one to start the book with. It is the best of the three, in my opinion. It has more depth and seems to me a lot was put into this one. There are supporting characters that are well done and there is a good plot. I would like to say this could have been a longer novella length book, but does well on its own in its current length. I don’t think the intimate scenes were overdone or to stereotypical. Except for some word play around the scenes were well done. The characters nicely developed. A good story overall.

Work For Me is about Alana, an office employee and the fix-it man, Nick. She’s older and in need, and he’s ready to fix her kitchen and maybe more. That’s what she fantasizes about. Not as good as the first story, shorter and more typical of the genre I think.

This one starts off with some phrasing that’s quite different from the first story and thus took me a while to grow accustomed to. I gave it a chance and enjoyed the parts after that, they were quite realistic, until the last half, which turns into a fantasy piece. You’ll see when you read it.

Play For Me: Teacher, Kate Benson ends up with a surprise when her elderly private piano teacher is replaced with her former high school piano teacher, Nat Chapman. The one she had to stop piano because of the feelings she had for him.

Another realism turns fantasy piece, but that’s what the genre is about. Creative in the construction of the intimate scene.

Get Crave For Me at:

amazon logo   

Visit Author Rebecca Chase at:

http://www.rebeccahchase.com/.

Connect with Rebecca Chase on:

facebook logo goodreads logoInstagram Logo with Link   twitter logo

Dancing on Dewdrops – A Review

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The summary on Amazon.com reads:

Dancing on Dewdrops is an entrancing collection of poems, prayers, and short stories that capture the utter joy of youth, wrestle with the inherent elements of change, offering strength and solace—all while celebrating life across several generations. The rustic poetry, prayers, humor and short stories for children will appeal to all ages. Dancing on Dewdrops provides inspiration, delivering the lasting imagery that leaves an indelible imprint on the heart and human spirit.

I honestly wish that I could agree with this summary, or with the one other review that loved the book and gave it a 4 out of 5 stars. Unfortunately, this books is (as far as I know) my very first 1 star review.

This book of “rustic poems, prayers, and elegant short stories…” was not at all what I expected, and not at all up to my standards for any of the sections.

In the first section the author has provided us with several poems of varying lengths that mostly either deal with boyhood or death/loss. However, the poems read as though he couldn’t decide between traditional rhyming schemes and ‘free form’ poetry and so got caught in a bad in-between. On top of that, many of these poems do not portray what the descriptions say they are about. Poetry is very subjective, but in my opinion these could have used more work.

In the second section we are given a few prayers, mostly short and mostly not rhyming (though a few fall back into the couplet trap here and there). However, they all sound very bland and typical of prayers I’ve been hearing weekly for my entire life. I was really hoping for more elegant writing and more eloquent prayers.

The third section is labeled as ‘short stories’ but they are really a few short tales of the author’s childhood. While these are mildly interesting, the writing is, again, not as well refined as I believe that it should be and each tale needed a bit more editing and polishing.

Finally, they fourth section contains a duology of children’s stories, labeled as having ‘morals’ these tales are long winded, written in language too advanced for most still reading ‘children’s’ stories, and needed much more polishing before being put out for show. I believe with another revise and edit session (or two) this book could really pop, but right now everything is metered, rhymed, and written in a way that makes it feel off and grating to my nerves in a very bad way.

The cover, however, is GORGEOUS!

Great stories and imagery … enhanced with reality. Down and Out in the Big Mango. @Deepcaster

Down and Out in the Big Mango

What the heck is the Big Mango? When I agreed to read Down and Out in the Big Mango by Tony McManus, that was the question I was asking myself. That’s what I get for not reading the complete title. I mean, that’s a great title, right? Who can blame me for not seeing the “and Other Thai Stories” part?

Once opening the cover and beginning the adventure I immediately knew the Big Mango had to do with Thailand, and specifically Bangkok, the capital city, the sister city of Washington, D.C., Liverpool, and Brisbane to name a few.

This wasn’t intended to be my book to review on the team but I’m Ko Chang Island Thailandglad I ended up here. As a collection of short stories, it was an easy read. I like shorts because I don’t have to commit a great deal of time at one go because I know I can read one entire entry from beginning to end without losing my spot or having to remember what happened before.

I didn’t know what to expect from tales of Thailand. Many people instantly think of Bangkok and the stereotype things about certain districts there. My mind didn’t drift to those places. I always think of a song from the 1980s about Bangkok and a game of chess.

The review!

McManus gives stories that from the beginning start out as black and white stories. People have clear thoughts of issues and beliefs. It’s like a coloring book where lines dictate where to use the crayons. Bangkok, ThailandMcManus puts his characters into the picture and then blurs those lines with reality.

What would you do if you faced capturing a white-collar criminal, an embezzler of money from the super-rich, the millionaires? I know what my answer was, is, or whatever. I’m still having a difficult time with it. McManus shows the layers of our beliefs and rules and then throws in reality, situations that test how either correct or perhaps needed those beliefs, and rules are.

Down and Out in the Big Mango and Other Thai Stories is a sleeper hit in my opinion. You get the imagery of a beautiful country, an inside look at the people and some of the interesting character that makes it a unique place on earth. I would love to visit a place like this, perhaps even live there.

Recommendation

I think most anyone would enjoy this that likes a bit of intelligent humor, some intrigue at times, relationships, beautiful imagery, and life questions. An enjoyable series of short reads. A great introduction to Tony’s other books you can find on his Author Page at Amazon by clicking HERE for the US or HERE for the UK.

RATING

Character Believability: 5
Flow and Pace: 5
Reader Engagement: 4.5
Reader Enrichment: 5
Reader Enjoyment: 4.5
Overall Rate: 4.8

Author: Tony McManus
Title: Down and Out in the Big Mango, and Other Thai Stories
File Size: 454 KBDown and Out in the Big Mango by Tonay McManus
Print Length: 149 pages
Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
Publisher: Ridge-Way Publications; 1 edition (January 14, 2014)
Publication Date: January 14, 2014
Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, LLC.
Language: English
ASIN: B00HVE1YHG
Text-to-Speech: Enabled
Format: Kindle-US   Kindle-UK
Price:  4.99 (US)   £3.20 (UK)
Lending: Enabled

About the Author

Born in Manchester, I left England many years ago to get about and see the world. It was the best move I ever made. After lots of traveling and adventure in Africa, where I worked in many jobs to serve my passion for travel such as English teacher, bar tender, taxi driver, construction worker in the Transvaal goldmines and the Tony McManuscopper mines of Zambia.
Eventually, I moved to Canada where I still live part of the time. I made my home in Quebec, living in Montreal for many years before moving north into the Laurentian Mountains where I built a log home in the town of Ste. Adele.
I’m now living in Chiang Mai, Thailand and like it a lot. In the winter of 2012, I published my first novel on Amazon: The Iran Deception. Last November I published Down And Out In The Big Mango a collection of Thai short stories. I am presently working on a second novel: A Bangkok Interlude.

Goodreads    Author Site


About the Reviewer

Ronovan Hester is an author, with his debut historical adventure novel Amber Wake: Gabriel Falling due out in Valentine’s Day of 2016. He shares his life as an amnesiac and Chronic Pain sufferer through his blog RonovanWrites.WordPress.com. His love of poetry, authors and community through his online world has lead to a growing Weekly Haiku Challenge, a  Weekly Fiction Prompt Challenge, and the creation of a site dedicated to book reviews, interviews and author resources known as LitWorldInterviews.com.

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@RonovanWrites

© Copyright-All rights reserved by LitWorldInterviews.com 2015

An @COLLEENCHESEBRO INTERVIEW WITH @SARAHMALLERY1

I am excited to introduce you to author, Sarah (S. R.) Mallery who shared with me that she has worn various hats in her life. Sarah also shares that she was, “First, a classical/pop singer/composer, she moved on to the professional world of production art and calligraphy.Next came a long career as an award-winning quilt artist/teacher and an ESL/Reading instructor. Her short stories have been published in descant 2008, Snowy Egret, Transcendent Visions, The Storyteller, and Down in the Dirt.”

Author S. R. Mallery

I actually met Sarah on Twitter. I was immediately intrigued because she was such an engaging personality, something that you don’t always find on Twitter. In no time at all, I was reading her novel, “Sewing Can Be Dangerous and Other Small Threads.” You can read my review here, and below is the synopsis for this excellent book:

These eleven long short stories range from drug trafficking using Guatemalan hand-woven wallets to an Antebellum U.S. slave using codes in her quilts as a message system to freedom; from an ex-journalist and her Hopi Indian maid solving a cold case together involving Katchina spirits to a couple hiding Christian passports in a comforter in Nazi Germany; from a wedding quilt curse dating back to the Salem Witchcraft Trials to a mystery involving a young seamstress in the infamous Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire; from a 1980’s Romeo and Juliet romance between a rising Wall Street financial ‘star’ and an eclectic fiber artist to a Haight-Asbury love affair between a professor and a beautiful macramé artist gone horribly askew, just to name a few.

What was really amazing was that Sarah likes to do interviews! So here you have it. My interview with Sarah (S. R.) Mallery:

Colleen: Sarah, tell me something about yourself. Where do you live? Are you a full-time writer?

I live in Southern California, where the weather is basically so much tamer than the rest of the U.S. and Europe I have survivor guilt! And no, I would say I am only a two-thirds of the time writer. One-third of my time is spent teaching English to people from other countries and I have learned over the years that it is that balance of being inside my head––both creatively and promotion-wise––and helping others is what works best for me.

Colleen: What inspired you to write Sewing Can Be Dangerous and Other Small Threads? Have you written other books?

When my father told me about the infamous Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire of 1911, I had already been a quilt designer/teacher for over twenty years. So, in doing my research on that horrific event, I was particularly drawn to those hapless immigrant seamstresses who, in spite of their overworked hours and low pay, were often the only ones in their families that could find work in the U.S. I also enjoyed thinking about the sewing aspect, surrounded as I was by so many quilts and fabrics in my studio. I therefore decided to continue writing short stories, connected only by one element of sewing/craft. That actually helped focus me on future stories. In other words, no matter what time period I was reading about, that context kept me asking questions like how would sewing/crafting ‘fit’ into a story that takes place in this time frame? Who would be the likely characters?

Yes, I’ve written two other books: TALES TO COUNT ON (http://amzn.to/1x8QqyD) and UNEXPECTED GIFTS (Currently set to be re-released in late June 2015).

Colleen: What message do you want your readers to get from SEWING CAN BE DANGEROUS?

By interweaving a ‘thread’ of sewing/crafts throughout each of my stories, I wanted to emphasize how in life as well as history, the ‘little things’ are what loom large. In other words, these quilts, necklaces, crafts, etc. stay with us no matter what events revolve around them.

That idea extends to when I do research for my writing. I am always fascinated by some small fact that most people might pass over but for me, pops out from the page. Soon, that fact starts to percolate in my brain until it becomes a major plot device and/or character development.

Colleen: Who is your favorite author and explain what really inspires you about their work.

Although there are several authors I admire, I would have to choose Harper Lee, who taught me that being simple yet lyrical, presenting appealing characters and touching subjects, and ‘showing not telling’ is more powerful than the most flowery, magnificent prose which can after a while, for me at least, go in one ear and out the other.

Colleen: What was the hardest part about writing this particular book?

I would say perhaps looking for a ‘sewing element’ in my research process that I could authentically use in a story. Originally, there were a couple more stories, but I decided to scrap them because their sewing component seemed too manufactured.

Colleen: Do you have any works in progress you will tell us about?

Yes. I am currently working on an historical fiction western and enjoying not only that time period, but also the colorful lingo that was used. Here’s the synopsis:

The
Dolan Girls by S. R. Mallery has it all. Set in Nebraska during the 1800s, whorehouse madams, ladies of the night, a schoolmarm, a Pinkerton detective, a Shakespeare-quoting old coot, brutal outlaws, and a horse-wrangler fill out the cast of characters. Add to the mix are colorful descriptions of an 1856 land rush, Buffalo Bill and his Wild West Show, Annie Oakley, bank/train robberies, small town local politics, and of course, romance. It’s not only a taste of America’s past, it’s also about people overcoming insurmountable odds.

Thank you, Sarah, for spending some time with us and sharing about your book, “Sewing Can be Dangerous & Other Small Threads.” I look forward to reading your other books too!

***

Here is An Excerpt from Sewing Can Be Dangerous & Other Small Threads

From “A Drunkard’s Path”

“…Are you kidding me?” Deborah exploded. “My life is falling apart! C’mon, curses don’t really happen, do they? I mean, what can I do? You tell me now!” She segued into a screech.

“Come over to my place tomorrow and I’ll try to relate it all to you, I promise…”

….”Do you know anything about the Salem Witchcraft trials?” The older woman leaned in toward her niece, as if casting a spell herself.

“No, not much, why?”

“You remember Martha Stinson from my quilt group? Well after the wedding, she showed me a journal written by a relative of hers and frankly, I am very concerned about you. It seems one of the accused witches from the original Salem trials might have actually had a connection with a real witch, an ancestor of Martha’s…”

* * * *

Inside the packed meetinghouse, dust particles from mud-caked boots floated throughout the air, rendering it dense, murky. That year, April had been an unkind month to Salem Village. Rain-drenched meadows produced a sludge that clung to the edges of women’s dresses, creating odors so foul that in such tight quarters, it became difficult to breathe. But people weren’t concerned with such matters on this day. They had gathered for a higher purpose: the Devil was in Salem, and they wished him thwarted at all costs. Even the constant threat of Indian attacks and surviving harsh winters paled in comparison to what was happening now, in that room, swelling with apprehension.

Crammed into high-walled pews, dark wooden benches, or simply shoved up against walls, spectators filled every conceivable space in the meetinghouse. Donning black hats, cloaks, and breeches, the men angled forward, their eyes boring holes into the five men sitting up front, yet it was the women who carried the greatest burden that day; their hooded coats and muffs covering their recently unkempt hair and unwashed fingernails, couldn’t disguise the uncertainty they felt about their community’s loyalty to them and how it would all end.

Sitting at the head of the counsel table, amongst other magistrates in the newly appointed Court of Oyer and Terminer, John Hathorne and Jonathan Corwin quietly conferred with each other before beginning their first round of questioning. Arrogant, self-important, the black-robed magistrates assumed their positions on the political totem pole, and having been brought to Salem for such a specific purpose, they dared not disappoint. They were on a mission to deliver souls. Hathorne, displaying the greatest exhibition of self-aggrandizement, seemed the most severe. With no real legal experience, and having only glanced at Sir Mathew Hale’s Trial of Witches, and Joseph Granvill’s Collection of Sundry Trials in England, Ireland the week before, he nonetheless believed he was more than competent to interrogate the accused.

At the front of the room facing the magistrates, sat all the accusers, the “afflicted” girls: Abigail Williams, her cousin Betty Parris, Ann Putnam, Sarah Bibber, Sarah Churchill, Elizabeth Booth, Mercy Lewis, Susanna Sheldon, Jemima Rea, Mary Warren, Mary Walcott and Elizabeth Hubbard. With downcast eyes and folded hands, they appeared demure; inwardly they were experiencing emotions quite different from anything they had ever known. Childhoods stocked with adult repression and fear now served as a springboard to the frenzy of accusations they had created, because on this day, along with their catharsis and even exhilaration, came the most important emotion of all: a sense of empowerment. At last, they were getting adults to listen to them, and it was intoxicating.

John Hathorne commenced with the proceedings. “Bring in the accused, Bridget Bishop….”

Here’s what they’re saying about SEWING CAN BE DANGEROUS And Other Small Threads:

“S. R. Mallery is quite simply a master story-teller.”

“This is a box of bonbons, every story an eye-opening surprise. Eat one and you’ll want to devour the whole box.”

“An exquisitely crafted, impressive portrayal of life’s journey!”

Women, sewing, history, and storytelling. A quilt of wonderful stories.”

“Rich and beautiful stories that will captivate you.”

“These stories will stay with you long after you’ve finished the book…”

“I was amazed by the variety of stories that took place in various locations, and at different historical times.”

Here’s where you can find Sarah:

Website/Blog: http://www.srmallery.com

Twitter: @SarahMallery1

FB: http://facebook.com/pages/SR-Mallery-Sarah-Mallery/356495387768574

Google+:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/107388739382996104658/posts

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/7067421.S_R_Mallery

Pinterest: (I have some good history boards that are getting a lot of attention—history, vintage clothing, older films) http://www.pinterest.com/sarahmallery1/

Amazon Author page:
http://www.amazon.com/S.-R.-Mallery/e/B00CIUW3W8/ref=ntt_athr_dp_pel_1

Amazon link to SEWING CAN BE DANGEROUS: http://amzn.to/1P8OTyo

Audible.com link for SEWING CAN BE DANGEROUS: http://bit.ly/1uyFUuF

B&N: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/s/sewing-can-be-dangerous-and-other-small-threads?keyword=sewing+can+be+dangerous+and+other+small+threads&store=ebook

Kobo: https://store.kobobooks.com/en-US/ebook/sewing-can-be-dangerous-and-other-small-threads

Skribd: https://www.scribd.com/book/260906999/Sewing-Can-Be-Dangerous-and-Other-Small-Threads

iBooks: https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/sewing-can-be-dangerous-other/id982813512?mt=11

An @COLLEENCHESEBRO BOOK REVIEW OF “Sewing Can Be Dangerous and Other Small Threads” @SARAHMALLERY1

Sewing Can Be Dangerous and Other Small Threads

Title:  Sewing Can Be Dangerous and Other Small Threads

Author:  Sarah Mallery

Website: srmallery.com

ASIN:   B00VIEZ2QY

Pages:  276

Genre: Literature in Fiction, Historical Fiction, Short Stories

Take a step back into history, and follow the threads of eleven stories that feature mystery, romance, and suspense, woven into a tapestry quilt of events that will lead you through many genres; all with the theme of “sewing” interwoven into the collection.

From the nimble fingers of a slave stitching codes into her quilts to help runaway slaves obtain freedom, to a mystifying fire during the infamous Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire, to a Haight-Asbury romantic interlude between a professor and a bewitching macramé designer; each story adds another quilt block to this duvet of skillfully intertwined tales.

One of my favorite stories in this collection is the yarn about a pioneer wife and mother who gets her first sewing machine. Anyone who is an avid sewing buff, or quilter will laugh at the competition between her family and her craft. Stitch by stitch, she is able to head off one of the worst Pioneer/Native American clashes that could have killed many on both sides.

I was so wrapped up in reading this particular story, I found myself laughing out loud, to the chagrin of my poor sleeping husband next to me, which made the story even funnier! I love when an author imprints their words on my heart.

Sarah Mallery

Author: Sarah Mallery

These tales were skillfully fashioned within each historical period concerned, and I found them to be unique and unusual. I was astounded at the originality of linking the tales with the idea of sewing becoming the underlying theme in each plot. Each story then becomes a cog, in the crazy quilt of design, with Sarah Mallery stitching a place in our hearts with her words.

Anyone who enjoys variety in their reading tastes will relish these stories. Just because there is a sewing premise in each story does not mean that men will not enjoy this assortment of short stories. There is enough history, murder, and excitement to keep you guessing all through the book.

I loved this assortment of short stories, and they left me wrapped in warmth, just like a quilt constructed from the hands of the author herself.

RATINGS
Realistic Characterization: 5/5
Made Me Think: 4/5
Overall enjoyment: 5/5
Readability: 5/5
Recommended: 5/5
Overall Rating: 5

Buy it at: Amazon
Format & Pricing
Paperback: $8.60 US
Kindle: $2.99 US

Goodreads

 Colleen_Silver_Threading

 

 

 

 

 

@ColleenChesebro

www.SilverThreading.com

 

 

 

Loves Lost by Sourabh Mukherjee #Free for #Kindle

Want to download a Kindle Book for FREE?

You have 5 Days of FREE!

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Sourabh Mukherjee has put his Romance Short Story collection Loves Lost for FREE from February 23-27. I’ve reviewed it here on LWI and you can read it by clicking here, or you can read the shorter review on Amazon.

You can also read the Author Interview I did with Sourabh by clicking here or the image below.

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#BookWorm @RonovanWrites Review Grá mo Chroí Love Stories from Irish Myth @aliisaac_ & @MJDougherty33

Grá mo Chroí

‘Love of my Heart’

 Love Stories from Irish Myth

ali isaac jane doughertyTitle: Grá mo Chroí Love Stories from Irish Myth
Author: Ali Isaac & Jane Dougherty
Format: Kindle
Price: $.99
File Size: 2095 KB
Print Length: 88 pages
Genre: Fantasy, Irish Mythology
Publisher: Dougherty- Isaac
Published: 11 February 2015
Language: English
ASIN: B00SQ2IUZQ
Text-to-Speech: Enabled
Word Wise: Not Enabled
Lending: Enabled
Sold by: Amazon
US and UK

I received Grá mo Chroí Love Stories from Irish Myth in preparation of an interview. I want to say I may have been asked to review it but you guys know my memory issues so I’m not positive. Regardless, as soon as I went to Amazon and saw what it was, I responded in email YES!!!! gimme an interview!!! PLEASE! Okay, maybe I wasn’t THAT exclamatory, but I was very interested. This was a new genre for me to venture in to. As for the interview? You’ve read the great answers to my meager questions to the authors already. But did I like the book, or simply liked the authors? You know. that does happen.

Let’s start with the Book Description you find on Amazon:

Long ago in a green island surrounded by protective mists, a people lived among the relics of a bygone age of which they knew nothing, not being archaeologists, but around whom they created a mythology. They were a volatile people, easily moved to love or war, and motivated by a strict sense of honour. They had women warriors and handsome lovers, wicked queens and cruel kings, precious heroines and flawed heroes. Magic was in the air, beneath the ground, and in the waves of the sea, and hyperbole was the stuff of stories. They were the Irish, and these are a few retellings of some of their beautiful stories.

Now it’s my turn.

The stories are of love and tragedy and more. I felt while reading the stories I was reading not about people in a book, or about love between two people and what befalls them but the love of a people for their homeland and their culture and the tragedies they faced throughout the ages. Yes, it hit me where it hurt, or it felt. Got me in the heart. If you want, you can skip to the score and go buy the book now. Or you can keep reading. Buy now or read and then get it, it’s up to you, but you won’t regret getting this one.

The stories selected for retelling are linked at times, not intentionally so, but it happens and in a way you end up reading a longer story, a small novella of sorts. You have a common theme and even recurring characters that either are mentioned or actually show up again. The two styles of writing that Ali Issac and Jane Dougherty have are different but not so much that you really notice or is so much a distraction. I think it is more the selection of stories they chose to retell that shows their differences and interests, but that to me lends some added diversity to the book. And it also shows how Irish stories are so linked together in so many ways.

When first beginning to read the book I had to stop because the language is a bit different than I am accustomed to. The language is beautiful. By that I mean it makes you feel and drift along with the stories. After a few lines, a passage you are in the story and  no longer realize you may be reading in a style that you are not accustomed to.

Each story led me to want to see a larger story of each. The imagery was very well done and at times I could truly see what was happening. I would like to see if the authors would take some of the stories and expand on them and tell a what happens next story. Perhaps a future collaboration?

What I really took away from this was a new love of a style of language that I want to incorporate in my own writing. Not so much the actual style but the way words are used. You feel love in the work. You know the people in the stories are feeling what is being said.

A retelling of stories for us today is a great idea. It’s nice to learn about these tales that are part of a culture and heritage. That’s one thing not to miss when reading this book. These are not fairy tales or bed time stories. These are parts of a past.

Character Believability4Grá mo Chroí: Love Stories from Irish Myth
Flow and Pace3
Reader Engagement–4
Reader Enrichment–5
Reader Enjoyment5
Review Rating Results–4.2

Get it on Amazon today by clicking HERE!

And UK HERE!

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Reblog and share all you like. PLEASE! Authors need all the exposure they can receive. Thank you.

 

 

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@RonovanWrites

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Loves Lost author Sourabh Mukherjee Q&A

 

sourabh mukherjeeRW: Let’s start with a little about where you are from.

SOURABH: I am from India, born and brought up in the city of Kolkata. Kolkata is the capital of the state of West Bengal, located on the banks of the Hooghly river. It is the main educational, cultural and commercial center in the eastern part of the country. The Kolkata Port is the country’s oldest operating port. Kolkata was the capital of the British Government in India till 1911 when the capital was shifted to New Delhi.

RW: Let’s get right into your book today before we go into my other questions. Why the title Loves Lost for your book of short stories?

SOURABH: Loves Lost is a collection of three short stories in the Romance genre, all woven around the theme of lost love. There could be a variety of reasons why relationships do not work out but at the end of the day, as George Martin says, ‘When the sun has set, no candle can replace it’.

RW: What inspired the Loves Lost? loves lost sourabh mukherjee

SOURABH: My own take on love and relationships and my keen interest in the workings of the human mind account for the manner in which love and its rituals are conducted in my stories.

The stories in the book deal with human emotions that I feel most readers can relate to. Many of us have nurtured unprofessed love in our hearts for years, have struggled to cope with lost love, have allowed our inner devils to ruin relationships, and have found love when we least expected to. My stories grow out of such experiences and observations.

RW: Tell us about the stories we’ll find.

SOURABH: Loves Lost is a collection of three love stories that go beyond conventional ‘happily ever after’ endings and offer realistic views of the variety of emotions one goes through when love comes calling.

The story ‘Mine Forever’ is about a young, successful entrepreneur nursing a broken heart and seeking refuge in alcohol and his work. The story takes the reader to the after-party of a corporate awards function when the protagonist in his drunken stupor finds the woman of his dreams drop in to congratulate him on his success and resolves to win her back.

‘The Thing About Memories’ is about a man recovering from a near fatal accident with no recollection of the past. A brisk read with a lasting impact, the story reveals how a billboard advertisement brings the man face-to-face with a past best forgotten.

The protagonist in the story ‘Love Came Calling Again’ has a highly romanticized vision of love that is often disengaged from reality. When the harsh realities of life take a toll on her relationship, she meets a stranger on the Internet.

As the blurb sums it up, Loves Lost is ‘a collection of three contemporary romantic short stories that take the reader on a whirlwind journey interspersed with betrayal, separation, heartbreak and a smile or two.’

RW: What message do you think your book delivers to the reader?

SOURABH: The stories deal with human emotions that most readers will relate to. While the collection of short stories is primarily meant to be a realistic and at the same time an entertaining depiction of the various facets of love, I would feel my efforts have been rewarded well if the stories in the book motivate readers to realize the value of the gift of love (which not everyone is blessed with), ensure the honesty and sanctity of their feelings, and never let their inner devils ruin their relationships.

RW: Describe your book in one word.

SOURABH: Soul-searching

RW: Where can we get your book now?

Amazon Kindle US & UK.

RW: What is your background in writing, what makes you a writer?

SOURABH: I’ve been writing for as long as I can remember. I have never really written for a purpose – it is just something I love to do. In my early childhood, I would spend hours writing (as well as making illustrations for my own stories). A number of my poems were published in children’s magazines back in the day. I continued to write through my teenage and later in college.

I kept writing in office magazines for a couple of years, but the demands of my career as an Information Technology professional and my travels across the world soon left me with very little time and creative energy to write fiction. I churned out technical whitepapers and non-fictional articles that got published in journals of repute like The Datawarehousing Institute (TDWI) Business Intelligence Journal Summer 2013 edition.

However, in the process, I grew as a person getting to observe people from widely varying cultural backgrounds and to study their emotions, their thoughts, their behavior from various perspectives. And stories began to grow all over again.

Also, writing is often a cathartic experience for me. It helps give vent to my emotions and create stories out of them. There is a bit of me in each one of my stories.

And a year back, I went back to writing fiction.

My first novella Nargis Through my Summers was published on Amazon Kindle in April 2014 and opened to 4-star reviews in Amazon and Goodreads. Loves Lost is my latest collection of short stories that was released on the 12th. of December, 2014.

cover2RW: What other books do you have to share with us and can you tell us a little about them? Do you have any full length novels in the works?

SOURABH: I would like to take this opportunity to talk about my book Nargis Through my Summers. Recipient of the Golden Pen Award in the Monsoon Romance Contest organized by a popular website in India, the novella is about a woman who moves in and out of relationships over the years, and a man who remains a silent and distant witness to the course of her life, with unflinching faith in the honesty and sanctity of his feelings for her.

The following are some of the comments the book has received over the last 6 months of its release:

A story which evokes yearning in our hearts, pushing the hands of time. Sourabh is economic in his choice of words, and allows the reader’s imagination to play. His style is that of a master story-teller and the build-up is strong. The end has a twist that rhymes well with the elevated level of this story. This is just the beginning; we want many more from you. Readers: THIS IS A MUST READ.’ – Amazon

This book is a must read for all romantics and “cynics” in equal measure. It’s a beautiful story, written in an extremely simple, subtle and poignant style. The way the story unfolded was beautiful yet unexpected’ – Amazon

A lucid read. I really liked how the author articulated the inner feelings of the protagonist. Also, must appreciate the in-depth description of emotions. I could almost visualize the scenes opening up and enacting in front of my eyes. It also got me nostalgic and took me on a trip down memory lane. The suspense of the story has been well kept under wraps.’ – Amazon

Oh what a treat it was! Just the right amount of text and right amount of storytelling. The ending was unexpected, but it made so much sense.’  – Goodreads

Just finished reading the story and have to say the ending was astounding! Really impressed. The buildup was awesome and the last chapter breath taking.’ – Goodreads

The book is available at Amazon US & UK.

RW: How do people connect with you through all forms of social media?

List links to all websites you have and social networks such as Twitter.

Facebook

LinkedIn

Google+ handle: thestoryteller1974

 

RW: Who are your favorite authors?

SOURABH: Jeffrey Archer is an all-time favourite. I think he is an institution when it comes to storytelling – whether it’s his novels or his short stories.

And then I have favourites by genres.

I have been a big fan of Agatha Christie – mainly because of Poirot’s methods of investigation, the witty repartees, the human emotions at the core of the crimes; and the laidback rural settings on the surface with undercurrents of malice and conspiracy in the Miss Marple stories. Among more recent authors, I like the Alex Cross stories by James Patterson – not just for the thrills, but also for the underlying human emotions. I loved Stieg Larsson’s works. I was floored by The Devotion of Suspect X by Keigo Higashino.

I absolutely adore Koji Suzuki’s books. I wish I could read his works in Japanese.

In the Romance genre, I have gone back again and again to Eric Segal’s works. I have Nicholas Sparks and John Green in my shelves and am very eager to read them.

Over the last couple of years, I have discovered Haruki Murakami and Gabriel Garcia Marquez – albeit in English translations of their works. And what a revelation! More reasons why I regret my linguistic limitations.

RW: What is your favorite beverage to drink, any kind?

SOURABH: It’s always black coffee, without sugar.

RW: What is your escape from writing when just needing a break?DSCN0670

SOURABH: I consider myself blessed to have a lot of empty space – parks, roads for pedestrians and trees – in my neighbourhood right in the middle of a busy city like Kolkata. Ditto for the surroundings of my office. A stroll in the evening with the wind in my hair makes all the difference. I also have a song for every mood, and music, for me, is a great stress-buster. I do manage to switch off when I want to and I consider myself lucky for being able to do that.

RW: What are you working on right now?

SOURABH: I am currently working on a novel which is a crime thriller on the surface but has a strong undercurrent of human emotions like love and betrayal at its core.

RW: What is your biggest tip for someone to getting published?

SOURABH: It is important to create real, identifiable characters in a story – unless of course one is writing a fantasy or a superhero story. Correct use of the language is essential. An author should ensure that a story progresses at a uniform pace – a story that slows down after an energetic start is a big let down. Finally, it is not about the length but always about the impact of a story. I have read 1-page stories that have left me thinking for days.

Recently, I wrote a guest blog for Elizabeth Grace on the motivation behind writing creativity that should also motivate someone getting published for the first time.

RW: What is your favorite word?

SOURABH: ‘Basically’ – I guess it comes from my inherent tendency to get to the bottom of matters.

 

And that my friends is basically the end of our time today with Sourabh. You may check out my review of Loves Lost here or go and check it out on Amazon here while you grab his book at the same time.

 

 

Ron_LWI

 

 

 

@RonovanWrites

 

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BOOK REVIEW BY @COLLEENCHESEBRO OF “The Uncanny Valley-Tales from a Lost Town” @GREGGYMILLER

The Uncanny Valley

Title: The Uncanny Valley – Tales from a Lost Town
Author: Gregory Miller
Illustrator: John York
Published: January 6th 2014 by West Arcadia Press (first published May 27th 2011)
ASIN: B00HQW3AHA
http://authorgregorymiller.wordpress.com/
Pages: 141
Genre: Fantasy, Paranormal, Mystery, Short Stories, Fiction, Flash Fiction, Horror

Welcome to the Uncanny Valley where a public broadcasting affiliate requested their listeners to submit essays about a ‘specific historical, ritualistic, or personal event’ that described the culture of their own hometown. What results is a horrifying collection of 33 eerie tales told by the residents of Uncanny Valley just as they were sent in to the contest. Some of these tales were just plain creepy and a couple were delightful and humorous in a ghoulish way. What remains to be seen is whether the town actually existed…

I loved the brevity of the stories and the fact that they were told in the words of the actual residents from all ages and occupations. Each story takes you on a personal journey of events that are spine-chilling and mind boggling. I loved reading this collection of adult ghost stories, which was the sort we would tell around a campfire when we were children.

My favorite story was “Mrs. Karswell’s Garden,” which was the tale of a supernatural garden that gave refuge to a brother and sister from a family that abused them physically and mentally. It was a poignant tale about transitioning into an adult.

I found this book on my usual search for free Kindle books on Amazon and was blown away by the writing and storytelling. If you are a fan of Ray Bradbury you will love the way the stories build off of one another bringing you to an unexpected end. Gregory Miller is adept at building suspense and drawing you along on a masterful journey of which you will never forget. I had some strange dreams for awhile after reading this book.

Gregory Miller

(Image Credit: Gregory Miller)

I do want to mention the illustrator, John York, whose drawings helped to illustrate the peculiar happenings in the book. Even with my Kindle paperwhite I was able to discern the terror and dread depicted on the faces of many of the town’s people. The drawings added a sinister flair and increased my enjoyment in the stories.

While reading, I was reminded how fragile life truly is and how there is magic present in our lives if we choose to look hard enough. There is a humanistic quality to each of these stories ranging from accounts of bullying, vengeance, a haunting, murder, and even vampires. The Uncanny Valley asks you to deal with your fears by taking the well-known in your life and molding it into something to be feared. Disturbing and creepy, you will love this book!

RATINGS
Realistic Characterization: 4/5
Made Me Think: 3/5
Overall enjoyment: 4/5
Readability: 4/5
Recommended: 4/5
Overall Rating: 3.8

Buy it at: Amazon
Format & Pricing:
Paperback: $6.99 US
Kindle: $.99 US

 

Colleen_Silver_Threading

 

 

 

@ColleenChesebro

www.SilverThreading.com

 

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#BookReview @RonovanWrites of Loves Lost by Sourabh Mukherjee

Title: Loves Lost
Author: Sourabh Mukherjee http://www.facebook.com/authorsourabhmukherjee
Format: Kindle Edition
Price: 3.99
File Size: 456 KB
Print Length: 28 pages
Genre: Short Story, Romance
Published: 11 Dec 2014
Language: English
ASIN: B00QWZ4DDC
Text-to-Speech: Enabled
X-Ray: Not Enabled
Word Wise: Not Enabled
Lending: Enabled
Sold by: Amazon

 

sourabh mukherjee loves lost book review banner

 I was given a copy of this book for an honest review and that honest review follows.

Loves Lost. Three stories of love with that common theme, lost. The theme, though, plays out differently in each story told.

First I want to say I read through the stories several times. They are easy reads in that they are easy to follow and quick to read.

I believe the quality of imagery and skill of writing seemed to grow with each story.

Being short stories the writer has the goal of pulling the reader in and quickly connecting to the characters. In the first story Mine Forever I did not feel this. This was a story that seemed to have potential but didn’t quite make it. The writing wasn’t very strong and the imagery was overdone and clichéd. I will say that with some rework I would like to see this story again, because the character, if written differently could really be one that people would love.

The Thing About Memories hit a bit home in some aspects considering I am an amnesiac as is the main character. The imagery and writing in this was superior to Mine Forever. I was almost there with the character at times and I was able to connect with him. Although, there were a few times I felt there was a bit of losing the way. But then, with an amnesiac that happens. Even though there was a bit of predictability as you hit the middle of the story you still aren’t certain about everything that happens, which I was impressed with. Overall a good story and would be interesting to see if there could be a follow up to this one. Might be interesting to see a short story on this character about this in upcoming books.

Love Came Calling Again is the final story and once again the imagery and quality increases. This time the main character is a woman and there is connection. Things occur that we can all relate to and I enjoyed this story with its somewhat sentimental aspect. I liked it but it was a bit predictable except for one certain aspect of the ending.

Ratings
Realistic Characterization: 2/5
Made Me Think: 2/5
Overall Enjoyment: 3/5
Readability: 4/5
Recommended: 3/5
Overall Rating: 2.8/5

 

Review By:

Ronovan

Ron_LWI

 

 

 

 

@RonovanWrites

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Book Review by @RobertHughes05 of “Short Shorts” by @CyrilBussiere

 

51T3hAPiZlL._AA160_
Title: Short Shorts
Author: Cyril L.C. Bussiere
ASIN: B00N534CCG
Published: 28 August 2014 by Cyril L.C. Bussiere
Pages: 28
Genre: Short Adult Stories
Format: Kindle Edition
Price: £0.77 includes VAT & free wireless delivery via Amazon Whisperent
File Size: 1076 KB
Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
Sold by: Amazon Media
Language: English
Text-to-Speech: Enabled

What the book is about: A collection of nine short stories covering subjects from cybernetic love, to ghosts and vampires to broken hearts and memories. ‘Short Shorts’ is thought-provoking and will make you think about what is really happening in the stories it contains.

Book Highlights: Bussiere has such a way with words that they make you feel you are actually in the story witnessing what is going on.  I felt I was sat in a huge auditorium watching each story unfold in front of me as I read each one. His words carry the reader along smoothly and never once did I have to stop and re-read anything because of any uncertainly of what was going on.  I’ve read the book several times and, each time, I come away with more thoughts of just what is happening in each story.  Some of the stories contain a twist I was never expecting, which is a sign of a great author.

Challenges of the book: I had no challenges reading this book or relating to any of the new characters introduced in each story.  I felt I knew them from the first few lines in, almost as if I had been reading about them for days, rather than the few minutes it took me to read each story.  Some may feel they want to know more about each character and wish the stories had gone on longer but, for me, I was able to imagine what may have happened to each character after finishing each story.  Each of the stories remained on my mind many days after reading the book.

What do you get from it: Love, pain, hurt, emotions, sadness, mystery, loneliness and, most of all, thoughts of what may have happened before and after each story.  I never thought a real mixture of emotions could be found in an entire book containing so few pages.

What I would have changed if anything: I would have loved some of the stories to have gone on a little longer but, I guess, Bussiere could not have then called the book ‘Short Shorts’.  I fell in love with some of the characters created by Bussiere and would dearly love to read more about them, especially the ones featured in the sadder of the stories.  I came away hoping they would eventually find some happiness in life.  Bussiere could certainly, and should consider, writing whole novels containing some of the characters from the stories in this book.

Who Would I recommend this book to?: Anybody who is a real lover of short stories and who likes a wide variation in the stories contained in a book.  It would also appeal to anybody who likes to think more about the characters and their stories, after finishing reading a book.  This is the perfect read for anybody with a busy lifestyle who has little, if any, time for sitting down to read a good book.

Read Cyril’s Lit World Interview here.

Ratings:
Realistic Characterisation: 5/5
Made Me Think: 5/5
Overall enjoyment: 4/5
Readability: 5/5
Recommended: 4.5/5
Overall Rating: 4.5

Review By:
Hugh Roberts
hugh_roberts_book_reviewer.jpg

 

 

@RobertHughes05 
hughsviewsandnews.com 

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