LitWorld’s 10 Questions with M. Laszlo, author of The Phantom Glare of Day.

 
The Phantom Glare of Day book cover.LitWorld’s 10 Questions
with
M. Laszlo

What would be your one sentence elevator pitch of what your book is about?
In this trio of novellas, three game young ladies enter into dangerous liaisons that test each one’s limits and force them to confront the most heartrending issues facing society in the early twentieth century. The Phantom Glare of Day is a compelling interrogation of who gets to decide what is right and what is wrong.

[The novellas are set during the height of WWI and post-WWI Europe.]

What book/author/movie/TV show/song might a potential reader compare your book to in order to get an idea of its feel and why?
The Phantom Glare of Day might best be described as traditional, twentieth-century melodrama suffused with the following: Goth youth culture, the film Nosferatu, lots of Germanic brooding, the poetry and symbolism of Nietzsche, and a ravishingly beautiful figure-skating ballet just for good measure.

Why did you choose this topic for your book?
This topic chose me. These novellas arise from a deeply held obsession with grasping the essential ethical issues that face society. By writing the book, it is my hope that the novellas may challenge readers to think about and to come to terms with those same heartrending questions.

What led to your choosing the setting for your book? In part your mention of steampunk as used in your book.
Having traveled to London, Paris, and Prague, and having kept travel diaries for those beautiful cities, there was no way to avoid my setting stories in those remarkable places. Interestingly, though, my impressions of Prague were always informed by the genre of steampunk. What I mean by that is that Prague is the city with which I’ve always associated the science-fiction play Rossum’s Universal Robots. Because of this, Prague inspired me to write about steampunk/primitive robotic technologies—as such, these peculiar technologies and themes and obsessions appear in that tale. With regard to Weimar, that’s the most peculiar question for me because I’ve never been there. Still, the history of das Bauhaus has always fascinated me—and because of this, there was no way to avoid the temptation to set a tale there.

How did you come up with the title of your book?
The Phantom Glare of Day comes from a line in “Butterflies”—a WW-era Siegfried Sassoon poem. The title seemed perfect to me because various world religions have always associated butterflies with the immortality of the soul. For me, that metaphysical idea resonates because these three novellas amount to a new kind of metaphysical storytelling.

How has your world traveling impressed itself on your writing?
Nothing has impressed my writing more than my travels to London, where I became fascinated by British colloquialism and phraseology. Nothing else makes British characters come to life more than giving them authentic voices as they engage one another in dialogue. In short, dialogue has to be real. Characters must talk the way people really talk. This comes down to the fact it is the vernacular that makes characters and their stories seem genuine. My travel diaries provided me with all kinds of descriptions of various places, of course; nevertheless, my travel diaries were most important to me in that they included many, many lists of those remarkable terms that only the Brits use.

What will connect the reader to the story?
These novellas tell of how people struggle with issues that anyone can find relatable: school bullying, abortion, euthanasia, political extremism, and homophobia. As such, any reader should be able to connect with the characters. At the same time, the narrator’s voice remains solemn and philosophical; moreover, the writing is suffused in objective correlative—symbols intended to resonate with the reader’s unconscious mind. If the reader really gives my work a chance, the reader can and will connect.
Remember, though, when you read The Phantom Glare of Day, you’ll quickly see that it’s like nothing you’ve ever read before. Perhaps that’s why the work is fated to get so many mixed reviews. This work is weird and revolutionary in its style.

Did you have difficulty deciding your book was ready to publish?
Yes and no. Leonardo Da Vinci said it best: “Art is never finished, only abandoned.”

What genre(s) and reader ages would your work fit best?
As for genre, there are different possibilities: coming of age, urban fantasy, historical fiction, metaphysical fiction, melodrama, and perhaps even magical realism. In truth, the work is trans-genre. Also, who cares what the genre is? It’s literature. And it’s meant for anyone mature enough to embrace the idea of freethinking and/or open-mindedness and/or freedom for the sake of freedom.

What’s your next project idea?
My next project promises to be a complete mind-scramble. In the coming book, it is my intention to take the reader on a journey alongside a figure who resolves the riddle of the universe—and in the final movement of the tale, the character will in fact explain the riddle of the universe. For that matter, too, the answer provided will be accurate. And that is my pledge.

Biography of M. Laszlo

M. Laszlo Author Photo M. Laszlo is the pseudonym of a reclusive author living in Bath, Ohio. According to rumor, he based the pen name on the name of the Paul Henreid character in Casablanca, Victor Laszlo.

He has lived and worked in New York City, East Jerusalem, and several other cities around the world. While living in the Middle East, he worked for Harvard University’s Semitic Museum. He holds a bachelor’s degree in English from Hiram College in Hiram, Ohio and an M.F.A. in poetry from Sarah Lawrence College in Bronxville, New York.

His next work is forthcoming from SparkPress in 2024. There are whispers that the work purports to be a genuine attempt at positing an explanation for the riddle of the universe and is based on journals and idea books made while completing his M.F.A at Sarah Lawrence College.

The Phantom Glare of Day is available at Amazon.

© 2014-2022- Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Hester’s Book Review of The Judas Robe by author Larry Rodness.

The Judas Robe Kindle EditionDESCRIPTION OF THE JUDAS ROBE by Larry Rodness

During the height of the Spanish Inquisition a ruthless inquisitor by the name of Bishop Roberto Promane tortures a fellow priest, Father Sanchez, for information about the whereabouts of a relic known as The Judas Robe. The robe is believed to be the single piece of physical proof of God on Earth. Promane succeeds in uncovering the robe only to lose it to Sanchez’s rescuers, the knights of The Order Of Christ.

Present Day

Joel Gardiner, a pre-med student, is attacked one night by thugs after leaving a campus pub. A young woman named Sophia rescues him and reveals that Joel’s mother, Natalie, is descended from the Order Of Christ, the faction that has kept the robe hidden for centuries. These thugs are part of a conspiracy group led by a Bishop Newman who seek the robe in order to uncover a secret held for centuries.

A BIT ABOUT WHO IS IN THE STORY

JOEL is a by-the-book pre-med student who comes from a divorced family where his father and brothers leave him with his mother who they believe is crazy for believing in a myth of her heritage. Once he gets to college he meets LISA and they quickly begin a relationship. Joel gets an internship at BIOPHARM, a pharmaceutical company, due to a discovery he made that could change the health of the human race, under the condition he can conduct his own research into a cure a rare that affects only around 7000 people. (This is all already established and explained as the story flows.)

Joel’s discovery as well as the Robe of Judas, the myth Joel’s family doesn’t believe in, are the two targets of BISHOP NEWMAN and his conspiracy group.

Joel is aided by SOPHIA and FATHER SANCHEZ who are all too familiar with the bishop and the robe. The reveals at the end are shocking actors in this play, but a couple are hinted at during moments in the story. All are believable in the context of the story.

THE REVIEW

LARRY RODNESS creates a fun ride that is engrossing and will keep you turning the pages. As a writer my biggest compliment to give another author is I want these characters to appear in a series of books. It would be an easy thing to do. The characters are all well defined and have distinct voices.

I’ve seen some reference Dan Brown, because it  has to do with the hunt for a Jesus associated item. I don’t get that vibe. The book is not that detailed or plodding as are Dan Brown’s famous books. The story has the details it needs as far as the Judas Robe. This keeps the book as a fast paced read. This book is its own story and not a pretender. The search for the robe is not a mystery of solving this puzzle or whatever. The real goal of Joel and Lisa is to survive. And if they can discover the Judas Robe is real and if so keep it out of the hands of the antagonist groups (yes I said groups), find a cure for the medical condition and make Joel’s discovery work for the human race along the way, then all the better.

As with any book I read I’m looking for the relationships and personalities. This one has reality relationships, meaning not perfect. There are strains on Joel and Lisa, Joel and his mother, Sophia and other characters and even some messy moments of bad choices made, or so the characters think. I personally don’t think so. But that’s the great thing about the book. You have villains you like and you want things to work out somehow and heroes you just can’t stand, or at least I can’t. And I think that’s the way it should be.

You come to understand choices made by both sides or all sides, there are multiple sides, but easy to follow.

As much as I like the story there are some plot holes that I think contribute to my attitude toward some characters as well as what I consider a confusing moment between Joel and his mother during a pivotal turn in Joel’s view points about so many things. Perhaps if there is another book it can be explained, but I suppose for now the reader has to come up with their own solutions. This moment doesn’t take away from the story or enjoyment, but the plot holes do pull you out of the world Rodness has created for a brief moment.

The pace of the story is excellent and I think that’s part of why any hiccups aren’t huge problems with enjoyment.

My favorite character is Sophia. A quiet character that seems to just be there and you’re not surprised by it but you should be. I got to the point I was expecting her to be just on the edge watching  each scene play out.

I will say there are sexual scenes in the book as well as killing with a bit of gore. Really only the sexual scenes were a little surprise but I think in a way they explain a bit about why the people end up willing to do what they do later on. Just mentioning the scenes wouldn’t have worked.

Summing it up: Not much filler. But as with any book there is a lull between those big moments, but as I said, not much. Great characters. Surprises. Mystery. Some layers and subplots that could play out further in later books but didn’t need to here.

 COMPARING

As I’ve said before… I’m not good at comparing authors work although that helps a reader get a feel for what they are getting into. Maybe you can think of a movie or book that is a mystery with a bit of action and rabid cult where you don’t have any fighting skills or clues and you’re told to find the treasure or your loved ones die.

RATING

A solid 3.6 out of 5 Stars. The only reason it is not a sold 4 is because of the plot holes.

A note on rating a book: People these days throw 5’s and 4’s around, when they really mean 3’s and 4’s. 3 means the book meets what you expect it to be. 4 is a really good book. A 5 rating should be a rare thing.

The above rating is just shy of a really good book rating because of just a few plot holes.

I rate using:

Realistic Characters/Character Development based on genre,
World Building
Editing
Believability based on genre
Overall Enjoyment,
Readability/Clarity
Flow

RECOMMEND?

I would read other books by this author. I would say the book would be for maybe 18 and over due to the sexual moments. You may say 16 because of it being a book and not visual. And I get that. I am on the fence.

Click one of the logos below to visit the book site so you can purchase. You can also read the first 3 chapters on Amazon with the Kindle Look inside feature.

241 pages.

$6.99 for Kindle.

$10.54 Paperback at Amazon

$16.00 Paperback at Barnes & Noble

amazon logobarnes & noble logo

 


Larry Rodness author profile photoAbout the author

Larry began his professional career as a singer at the age of 19 working with various bands around Toronto. After studying musical theatre Larry worked in summer stock where his love of writing began. From that point on he wrote for dinner theatre, trade shows, and even ice skating shows. To date he has written over 10 screenplays and has had 3 optioned.

 

https://www.larryrodness.com/
https://twitter.com/LarryRodness


© 2021- Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

#BOOK #REVIEW BY @COLLEENCHESEBRO OF “Rapture in the City,” BY AUTHOR @CHANNELINGLOVE

  • Title:  Rapture in the City (Sequel to Catching Feathers in the Wind)
  • Author: Diane Hall
  • File Size: 1025 KB
  • Print Length: 231 Pages
  • Publisher: http://www.dianehallauthor.com
  • Publication Date: August 18, 2015
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0145J0U8S
  • ISBN-10:  0955973392
  • ISBN-13: 978-0955973390
  • Formats: Paperback and Kindle
  • Goodreads
  • Genres: Magical Realism, Science Fiction & Fantasy, Angels & Spirit Guides

    *I voluntarily reviewed an Author’s Copy of this book*


“This sequel to Catching Feathers in the Wind begins when Stephen, Jayna and the other non-physical members of their soul group assemble on a distant star, fully awakened and aware of their connection with each other as a soul group consciousness. A large meeting is called, in which they are charged with returning to Earth in various forms, in order to trigger the inhabitants of the Earth into a spontaneous co-creation of Utopia. It seems straightforward enough, until they begin to encounter strange, invisible electromagnetic fields, stubborn twin flames who refuse to re-unite and carry out their joint mission, and a mysterious figure who holds all of their dreams by a thread… Who is the enigmatic leader of the Utopian Resistance Movement, and what does he really want? Will Heaven on Earth ever be allowed to birth itself, and will Natalie ever allow herself to be united with the one man she should never, ever want…”

Diane Hall has written this fantastic novel as a sequel to “Catching Feathers in the Wind,” which I reviewed some time ago. You can find that review here. I loved the first novel and was excited to see what the author had up her sleeve for the sequel.

When “The One,” gathers the soul group consciousness together, their hearts swell with the brightness of a flame. God has a mission for these entities, and the intent is to institute “The Divine Plan,” by returning the ‘All’ back into a state of harmonious and unified consciousness, or a Heaven on Earth.

A negative vibrational field covers the earth preventing God’s love from penetrating the hearts of mankind. The light-workers have been busy, though, and the loving energy surrounds the earth, seeking a path to touch humanity. As you can imagine, angels coming back to earth causes major chaos, sometimes with hilarious consequences and sometimes not so much as their antics mimic real life.

The thing I like best about Diane Hall’s writing is her intuitive way of portraying humanity. Her characters always come across as real, not contrived. She reprises the roles of Stephen and Jayna, from the first novel to work their magic and love behind the scenes once again back on earth. Two other couples figure prominently in the book. Their journey to finding true love is entertaining and engaging.

I also enjoyed the author’s use of incarnated fairy-folk in her story. This was a concept I have been dabbling with myself, so I was intrigued, to say the least.

The theme of the novel is love and the evolution of love on the wheel of life. There is one holdout, one person who resists the love fest by blocking all thought transference between himself and outside sources. The question is if we have heaven on earth, do we then give up our freedom of choice? Does humanity desire to live in a constant state of harmony between all sentient beings?

All I can say is that I am a fan of Diane Hall’s eternity. If you enjoy love stories with a twist of magic, you are going to love this book.


Character Believability: 4
Flow and Pace: 4
Reader Engagement: 4
Reader Enrichment: 4
Reader Enjoyment: 4
Overall Rate: 4 out of 5 stars

4_stars_gold

Author, Diane Hall

About Diane Hall:

Diane Hall is an author and channel who writes novels, non-fiction, magazine features, comedy scripts, and songs about love, spirituality, and the joyful challenges of communication between dimensions.

She is inspired by her guides and the angelic realm to create books that touch the heart with memories of Heaven. She is also a drama postgraduate with a passion for Shakespeare and Rumi, and a desire to bring a sense of fun to the genre of spiritual fiction. She is a singer/songwriter, a meditation and intuitive development teacher, and a recovering chocoholic.

As a freelance writer, she has contributed to a number of new thought publications and websites, including Soul & Spirit and Kindred Spirit magazines.

“My dream is to create a life-changing body of work  –  literary, musical and lyrical  –  that reaches many hearts and minds and brings peace, awakenings, love, learning, joy and ultimately, a Heaven on Earth.”

You can find Diane Hall through Twitter @Channellinglove and Facebook at Diane Hall, and on her author blog, dianehallauthor.com

Book Review by @ColleenChesebro of colleenchesebro.com
2016-11-17-11-25-08

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Magic Unveiled: An Anthology available NOW!

Magic UnveiledGotta have them all! 9 stories of the Magical Realism genre now available. You’ll be surprised.

 

 

USA Today and Amazon BESTSELLING Authors!

 

༺Uma༻

༺Uma༻ rated it it was amazing

( I received this ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thanks to authors Alesha Escobar and Devorah fox for making sure the copy was made available to me on NetGalley.)

BLURB

Either the wondrous or the perilous awaits us when we play a hand at magic.

A hard boiled detective chases the supernatural, unveiling a frightening world right alongside modern man’s. A mother, able to grant wishes, shows us we must be careful what we wish for. An African Orisha might just pass you in downtown Los Angeles, eager to siphon some of your energy so that he will not fade out of existence.

From heart wrenching, ghostly goodbyes to relatives, to discovering sparks of otherworldly magic permeating contemporary society, these nine tales of magical realism and paranormal fantasy come together to form this enchanting and gripping anthology.

OVERALL REVIEW OF THE BOOK

Magic Unveiled is a well put together anthology of, well, magical stories. The stories deal with wishes to witches, all of them crafted beautifully. My favourites were The Black Dagger Gods by Alesha Escobar, Journey to a new home by Jayme Beddingfield , and Gypsum Jane’s Inkscapes by H.M.Jones.

Each story is unique and deals with various topics but the one thing almost all the stories have in common are human emotions. The stories deal with loss, happiness, fear, hope among other emotions. Despite their fantastical character, the stories are highly relatable because of the emotions prevailing in them. The language and writing style of all the stories were beautiful and uncluttered enabling me to read the entire book in one sitting.

GYPSUM JANE’S INKSCAPES by H.M. Jones (5/5)

A beautiful story to start off the anthology. This story deals with loss, love and hope. The author crafts a story that teaches the reader the tragedy of loss and the need for hope. The descriptions are beautiful and the places described by the author in the story are etched in my mind. I connected with the protagonist and was able to see the story through his eyes.

THE BLACK DAGGER GODS by Alesha Escobar (5/5)

Oh my Gods! I want a sequel to this story! Maybe a whole series would satisfy my appetite for this story. The plot was unique and refreshing. The story starts off with a whole lot of suspense and I loved how the whole thing played out. The writing style was very descriptive and the characters very realistic. Reading about Gods being so human-like was highly enjoyable.

THE ISIS ENIGMA by Samantha LaFantasie (4.5/5)

Once again, I want a whole series!! The author leaves a huge part of the story to the readers imagination. While I liked the end, I don’t just want to have to imagine. I want to know! This story is a different take on witches and is interlaced with emotions. The emotions of the protagonist adds a three dimensional character to the plot that keeps the reader hooked.

UNUSUAL SUSPECT by Ronovan Hester (4.5/5)

The whole premise is different and intriguing. The story left me asking for more. This story deals with hell and evil souls. It was highly interesting and I personally liked Max! I love Kick-ass female characters and Max fits the description to the T.

JOURNEY TO A NEW HOME by Jayme Beddingfield (5/5)

If you thought only long novels about lost love can bring tears to your eyes,..think again. This short and sweet story pulled at my heartstrings and I teared up so much I had to take deep breaths every five sentences or so. Loved the innocence and beauty of the story so much.

THE DARK ONES by Samantha LaFantasie and Keith Goodno (4/5)

Once again,I want a whole series! The premise is exciting. The protagonist’s fear seeps into us and I found myself drawn into the story. The end of the story made me feel all bold and fearless. I felt feminist power surge into me at the end of the story.

THREE WISHES by Alice Marks (4/5)

It is a story about wishes as the title denotes. Being a person who always wishes at 11:11 I totally understand the need to make wishes every chance one gets because who knows! The wish might just come true. It is a light take on wishes with a deeper moral.

BLACKWING by Devorah Fox (4.5/5)

It is a short and sweet story that makes the reader feel good at the end of it. It is the kind of story that puts a smile on readers’ faces. It is a story of lighthearted magic that reaches out to us during the most unexpected of times.

MIRROR ME by Raven Oak (4.5/5)

It is so different from all fantasy stories I’ve read so far. It is an intriguing plot that touches on father-son relationships and human emotions. The protagonist is well rounded and carries the plot forward with ease. For some reason, I really loved the quote below from the story.-

“You try and shut out the world, and the world will swallow you.”

CONCLUSION

It is an amazing collection of magical stories that are unique and different from each other. A must read!

RATING

Its a full 5

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Click the link to get it on Amazon!

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Magic Unveiled: An Anthology Pre-Order Today! Only .99!

On October 13, 2016

Magic Unveiled: An Anthology

Will be released and I’m part of it.

If you like the genre of Magical Realism, then this anthology of 9 stories from authors including USA Today, Seattle Times, and Amazon bestselling authors.

Not only can you get it on Amazon but Barnes & Noble and iTunes as well. Just click any of those three to pre-order today for .99 cents. When October 13th comes around that .99 cent offer disappears.

Magic Unveiled

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