BOOK REVIEW BY @COLLEENCHESEBRO OF “MOLLY LEE” by ANDREW JOYCE @HUCKFINN76


Title: Molly Lee

Author: Andrew Joyce

ISBN: 1511402989

ISBN 13: 9781511402989

ASIN:  B00VEEJ97G

Published:  March 26th 2015 by Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

Pages: 428

Author website: Andrew Joyce

Genre: Western Fiction

*A copy of this book was provided by the author in exchange for an honest review, which follows.

The first time 18 year old Molly Lee meets “Lieutenant” Huck Finn and “Captain” Tom Sawyer it is 1861. The Civil War has just begun to rear its ugly head. Little does Molly know that this chance encounter with the two soldiers will change her life forever.

When a Yankee soldier attempts to commandeer Molly’s virtue and cause harm to her family, 24 year old Huck Finn comes to their rescue. Molly falls head over heels in love with the dashing Huck. She begs to be allowed to follow him when he leaves her family farm.

Huck strongly advises her not to come with him because, “He considers himself an honorable man, and honorable men don’t accept the hospitality of another man, and then ride off with the man’s daughter.”

Molly begs, and begs, finally wearing Huck down long enough to say that she can accompany him the next morning. When Molly awakens that fateful day, on July 23, 1861, it is to the realization that the two men have left without her. Not to have her love denied, Molly saddles a horse and sets forth on a trip of a lifetime to find the man she loves.

The adventures of Molly Lee take her from Virginia all the way to the Montana Territory. Spanning her life from 18 years to 56 years, this is her story. From whore houses to school rooms, Indians to cattle drives, Molly Lee pulls you into the saddle of the life adventures of a woman searching for the man she loves.

Author: Andrew Joyce

I loved the way Andrew Joyce portrayed Molly. She is a strong, independent woman, not afraid to say what she thinks. When Molly loses a lover in a catastrophic fire, I thought she had reached the end of her rope. Instead, she finds the courage to go on with her life, always searching for the elusive man of her dreams, Huck Finn.

The drive and ambition to find Huck Finn take Molly through many challenges and heartaches. To me, her ability to live by her own wits and survive, reminded me of the heroes from the old fashioned Western books I read as a young woman myself, written by Louis L’Amour.

Joyce writes in an easy, smooth, flowing manner. I especially enjoyed the portrayal of the cowboys and the cattle drive, as I experienced some of the same practices still in use today when I worked for a Montana cattle ranch some years ago. A few times, I know I felt the rush of the wind, and tasted the dust in my mouth, the descriptions were so perfect.

It should be noted that this book is a sequel to “Redemption,” also written by Joyce. However, not having read the first book, I felt this book stood alone in its own rights as an excellent read.

I enjoyed this rough ride through American western history, as seen through the eyes of a woman. Molly’s unique perspectives on life give credence to the belief that if you want something bad enough and keep working towards it, you will eventually get it. Oh, and there are whispers… Joyce is writing another book called, “Huck and Molly!” I can’t wait to read it!

RATINGS
Realistic Characterization: 4/5
Made Me Think: 3/5
Overall enjoyment: 4/5
Readability: 5/5
Recommended: 4/5
Overall Rating: 4.5

Buy it at: Amazon


Format & Pricing
Paperback: $16.99 US
Kindle: $3.99 US

Goodreads

(And guess who Colleen interviews this coming Friday here on LitWorldInterviews? You only get one guess.~Ronovan. No, not me, I just put my name so you knew I was the one typing this. I just had to jump in and mention the interview with that person you are supposed to be guessing.)

 


 

 

 

@ColleenChesebro

www.SilverThreading.com

Author: Colleen M. Chesebro

Colleen M. Chesebro is a Michigan Poet who loves crafting syllabic poetry, flash fiction, and creative fiction and nonfiction. Colleen sponsors a weekly syllabic poetry challenge, called Tanka Tuesday, on wordcraftpoetry.com where participants learn how to write traditional and current forms of haiku, senryu, haiga, tanka, gogyohka, tanka prose, renga, solo-renga, haibun, cinquain, Etheree, nonet, shadorma, Badger’s hexastich, Abhanga, and diatelle poetry. Colleen's syllabic poetry has appeared in the Auroras & Blossoms Poetry Journal, and in “Hedgerow, a journal of small poems,” and in various other online publications. She’s won numerous awards from participating in the Carrot Ranch Rodeo, a yearly 99-word flash fiction contest sponsored by carrotranch.com, an online writing community. Recently, she created the Double Ennead, a 99-syllable poetry form for Carrot Ranch. Colleen has published a collection of poetry, flash fiction, and short stories called, “Fairies, Myths & Magic: A Summer Celebration,” dedicated to the Summer Solstice. She contributed a short story called “The Changeling,” in the “Ghostly Rites Anthology 2020” published by Plaisted Publishing House. Colleen Chesebro’s poetry blog is called Word Craft – Prose & Poetry at https://wordcraftpoetry.com/ Her author blog is found at https://colleenchesebro.com where you will find her poetry and short stories.

10 thoughts on “BOOK REVIEW BY @COLLEENCHESEBRO OF “MOLLY LEE” by ANDREW JOYCE @HUCKFINN76”

  1. Reblogged this on Michaelphelps1's Blog and commented:
    I have revived my interest in Western Fiction . . . Colleen Chesebro’s in-depth Review of ‘MOLLY LEE’ by Aiuthor Andrew Joyce is a MUST READ for me. I am reading ‘The Sons of Big Bill Holston’ by Author JUDITH ANN McDOWELL, and loving it. Thank you, Colleen and LIR WORLD INTERVIEWS.

    Liked by 1 person

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