Tag Archives: Tom Sawyer

A @COLLEENCHESEBRO INTERVIEW WITH AUTHOR ANDREW JOYCE @HUCKFINN76

You are never going to believe this! I managed to get an interview with author, Andrew Joyce about his two novels and the characters he chose called, “Redemption” and “Molly Lee.”

Andrew Joyce lives on a boat in Fort Lauderdale, Florida with his dog Danny. “MOLLY LEE” is a follow-up novel to the best-selling “REDEMPTION: The Further Adventures of Huck Finn and Tom Sawyer.”


Here is the description of “Redemption,” from Amazon:

“Three men come together in the town of Redemption Colorado, each for his own purpose. Huck Finn is a famous lawman not afraid to use his gun to protect the weak. He has come to right a terrible wrong. After his wife’s death, Tom Sawyer does not want to live anymore; he has come to die. The third man, the Laramie Kid, a killer Huck and Tom befriended years earlier has come to kill a man. For these three men Death is a constant companion. For these three men it is their last chance for redemption.”

Here is the description of “Molly Lee,” from Amazon:

“Molly is about to set off on the quest of a lifetime . . . of two lifetimes. 

It’s 1861 and the Civil War has just started. Molly is an eighteen-year-old girl living on her family’s farm in Virginia when two deserters from the Southern Cause enter her life. One of them—a twenty-four-year-old Huck Finn—ends up saving her virtue, if not her life.

Molly is so enamored with Huck, she wants to run away with him. But Huck has other plans and is gone the next morning before she awakens. Thus starts a sequence of events that leads Molly into adventure after adventure; most of them not so nice.

We follow the travails of Molly Lee, starting when she is eighteen and ending when she is fifty-six. Even then Life has one more surprise in store for her.”

Click here to read my book review of “Molly Lee.”

Colleen: Andrew, what are the advantages and disadvantages of writing sequels to classics? How did you decide what the adult Tom and Huck would be like?

Andrew: In this case there was no disadvantage. I picked two beloved characters—the advantage was the same—everyone loves Tom and Huck.

This will probably not be believed, but I felt Sam Clemens standing behind me as I wrote this yarn. He wanted to write a sequel to Huck and Tom and I think he started to do so. However, he never finished it. Perhaps he used me as his instrument to get it off his chest, so to speak. In answer to your question, I don’t know how I decided to make Huck and Tom gunslingers in the Old West. The book wrote itself. But if you repeat that, I’ll deny it. After all, I’m the genius here!

Colleen: What is the single biggest challenge of creating the settings in your novels?

Andrew: I always write my settings from places I’ve been and experienced firsthand. So, that does not present a challenge for me. I don’t know about other writers, but I start a novel knowing the first sentence and the last paragraph. Then all I have to do is come up with 100,000 words to fill the space in between. That is the easiest part. I let my characters take me where they want to go. I may have something in mind for them, but when we get there, they may take me in a whole different direction in which I am more than happy to follow.

Colleen: O.K. Andrew, who would you most like to sit next to on an airplane?

Andrew: I don’t fly anymore. But if I did, I’d prefer an empty seat. If I couldn’t get that, then I reckon Jesus would do. I’m sure he would have some good stories.

Colleen: Who would play you in the movie?

Andrew: Depending on the day, either Matthew McConaughey or Jabba the Hut.

Colleen: What is the one thing you can’t live without?

Andrew: Oxygen.

Colleen: What’s the best writing advice you’ve ever heard?

Andrew: It’s not the best advice I’ve ever heard . . . it’s the best I’ve ever given. READ, READ, READ, and then READ some more. Read every book you can get your hands on. Read Steinbeck . . . “The Grapes of Wrath” and “Tortilla Flat.”

“The afternoon came down as imperceptibly as age comes to a happy man. A little gold entered into the sunlight. The bay became bluer and dimpled with shore-wind ripples. Those lonely fishermen who believe that the fish bite at high tide left their rocks and their places were taken by others, who were convinced that the fish bite at low tide.”— John Steinbeck, Tortilla Flat

That is some damn good writing. And when you read stuff like that you can’t help but become a better writer.

Colleen: What are you working on right now?

Andrew: Making a big, tall drink that is 90% vodka.

Thank you for this fabulous interview, Andrew. It was great learning about your novels and getting to know you better. I really enjoyed knowing your inspiration came from Mark Twain himself.

If you love historical fiction based in the American old west, you will love Andrew’s books!

Find Andrew on his blog: andrewjoyce.wordpress.com

In addition, you can find Andrew on:

Goodreads

Facebook

Twitter 

Colleen_Silver_Threading

 

 

 

 

 

 

@ColleenChesebro

SilverThreading.com

BOOK REVIEW BY @COLLEENCHESEBRO OF “MOLLY LEE” by ANDREW JOYCE @HUCKFINN76


Title: Molly Lee

Author: Andrew Joyce

ISBN: 1511402989

ISBN 13: 9781511402989

ASIN:  B00VEEJ97G

Published:  March 26th 2015 by Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

Pages: 428

Author website: Andrew Joyce

Genre: Western Fiction

*A copy of this book was provided by the author in exchange for an honest review, which follows.

The first time 18 year old Molly Lee meets “Lieutenant” Huck Finn and “Captain” Tom Sawyer it is 1861. The Civil War has just begun to rear its ugly head. Little does Molly know that this chance encounter with the two soldiers will change her life forever.

When a Yankee soldier attempts to commandeer Molly’s virtue and cause harm to her family, 24 year old Huck Finn comes to their rescue. Molly falls head over heels in love with the dashing Huck. She begs to be allowed to follow him when he leaves her family farm.

Huck strongly advises her not to come with him because, “He considers himself an honorable man, and honorable men don’t accept the hospitality of another man, and then ride off with the man’s daughter.”

Molly begs, and begs, finally wearing Huck down long enough to say that she can accompany him the next morning. When Molly awakens that fateful day, on July 23, 1861, it is to the realization that the two men have left without her. Not to have her love denied, Molly saddles a horse and sets forth on a trip of a lifetime to find the man she loves.

The adventures of Molly Lee take her from Virginia all the way to the Montana Territory. Spanning her life from 18 years to 56 years, this is her story. From whore houses to school rooms, Indians to cattle drives, Molly Lee pulls you into the saddle of the life adventures of a woman searching for the man she loves.

Author: Andrew Joyce

I loved the way Andrew Joyce portrayed Molly. She is a strong, independent woman, not afraid to say what she thinks. When Molly loses a lover in a catastrophic fire, I thought she had reached the end of her rope. Instead, she finds the courage to go on with her life, always searching for the elusive man of her dreams, Huck Finn.

The drive and ambition to find Huck Finn take Molly through many challenges and heartaches. To me, her ability to live by her own wits and survive, reminded me of the heroes from the old fashioned Western books I read as a young woman myself, written by Louis L’Amour.

Joyce writes in an easy, smooth, flowing manner. I especially enjoyed the portrayal of the cowboys and the cattle drive, as I experienced some of the same practices still in use today when I worked for a Montana cattle ranch some years ago. A few times, I know I felt the rush of the wind, and tasted the dust in my mouth, the descriptions were so perfect.

It should be noted that this book is a sequel to “Redemption,” also written by Joyce. However, not having read the first book, I felt this book stood alone in its own rights as an excellent read.

I enjoyed this rough ride through American western history, as seen through the eyes of a woman. Molly’s unique perspectives on life give credence to the belief that if you want something bad enough and keep working towards it, you will eventually get it. Oh, and there are whispers… Joyce is writing another book called, “Huck and Molly!” I can’t wait to read it!

RATINGS
Realistic Characterization: 4/5
Made Me Think: 3/5
Overall enjoyment: 4/5
Readability: 5/5
Recommended: 4/5
Overall Rating: 4.5

Buy it at: Amazon


Format & Pricing
Paperback: $16.99 US
Kindle: $3.99 US

Goodreads

(And guess who Colleen interviews this coming Friday here on LitWorldInterviews? You only get one guess.~Ronovan. No, not me, I just put my name so you knew I was the one typing this. I just had to jump in and mention the interview with that person you are supposed to be guessing.)

 


 

 

 

@ColleenChesebro

www.SilverThreading.com