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#Spotlight on Mikhaeyla Kopievsky of Resistance (Divided Elements #1)

MIKHAEYLA KOPIEVSKY is an independent speculative fictionML Profile Photo author who loves writing about complex and flawed characters in stories that explore philosophy, sociology and politics. She holds degrees in International Relations, Journalism, and Environmental Science.  A former counter-terrorism advisor, she has travelled to and worked in Asia, the Middle East and Africa.

Mikhaeyla lives in the Hunter Valley, Australia, with her husband and son. Divided Elements | Resistance is her debut offering.

  1. What’s Resistance about?

Resistance (Divided Elements #1) is the story of Anaiya 234 – a Peacekeeper of the Fire Element who patrols Otpor’s streets enforcing the Orthodoxy. In Otpor, a future post-apocalyptic Paris, Reistance book covverlife is a utopia – debauchery, security and stability are all provided by the Cooperative and maintained by strict adherence to the ruling ideology. Wrong action is termed Unorthodoxy and punished in a way similar to how crimes are dealt with in these days – retraint and detention. But, wrong thought – Heterodoxy – that is the real crime.

Only once has the crime of Heterodoxy taken place, and the original Resistor – Kane 148 – was Executed for it. But, now Heterodox murals are appearing on crumbling Otpor infrastructure, hinting at a new rebellion. Radical measures will be taken to find and take down this new Resistance, changing life in Otpor and Anaiya, forever.2.

2, Why did you write your book?

I started (and finished) writing this book for two reasons: 1) I needed to finally take my passion for writing seriously and commit to crafting and finishing a novel whose standard of quality I could be proud of, and 2) I needed to tell this story that calls into question humanity’s endless ambition to categorise society into us vs them, self vs other, familiar vs threatening. It is a theme that I am deeply passionate about – ignorance, xenophobia, intolerance and apathy are at the core of most of humanity’s problems. I believe if we focused on what we have in common, or on what our unique and individual skills, beliefs and perspectives can contribute, we would be that much closer to a more utopian ideal of humanity.

3. Who is the main character in Resistance?

Anaiya 234 is a complex and flawed character. Many readers find her unlikeable at the beginning of the story – which is not surprising since she is so fiercely and steadfastly dedicated to fulfilling her Peacekeeper role. As a Fire Elemental, she is conditioned to have only a limited spectrum of emotions, to be practical and stoic – a finely tuned instrument in keeping Otpor citizen’s compliant and the streets safe.

But, Anaiya has a shadowy legacy that follows her around. And when the discovery of new Heterodox murals gives her the opportunity to erase this legacy, she finds herself unable to say no. As the key player in the strategy to dismantle the Resistance, Anaiya is thrown into a new world where everything she has learned and taken for granted is suddenly called into question. Some of my favourite reviews of Resistance, talk about how much they love seeing the shift in Anaiya’s personality and the internal conflict she struggles with throughout the book.

4. Why do you think people should buy Resistance?

This book is for readers who love the dystopian and post-apocalyptic scifi genres, but who want a darker and grittier story than what YA books are offering. One reader called Resistance “Divergent’s bigger, badder, tougher, realer older sister”. While it will satisfy your need for the standard dystopian tropes, this book turns them on their head and puts them in a new context – in this story, the protagonist is not a hero, but a real and flawed character. And they’re not on a self-righteous path to bring down the Government, they’re actively fighting the Resistance while struggling with their convictions in doing so.

If you like stories with interesting characters and dynamic world-building that will challenge as well as entertain you, then I think this one is for you!

Resistance review blurb image

5. What’s your favorite writing snack?

I rarely snack when I write! I usually find that I get so immersed in the story, I either forget to eat or rush to pull together something very basic so I can get back into it! That being said, I do love to celebrate writing milestones with a nice dinner – my favourite is a local French restaurant (fitting, no?) where I could spend many a long, lazy Sunday brunch eating the charcuterie platter and indulging in a nice bottle of French wine!

6. What’s your favorite writing beverage?

As most authors would attest, writing is a caffeinated sport I am one of those strange people that doesn’t drink tea or coffee, so I get my fix with Coke Zero – sometimes spiked with bourbon if I’m channelling my inner Hemingway… But I am also very partial to mojitos in summer and a nice Hendricks G&T while the sun is going down. When I lived in Sydney. I loved visiting the small bars and speakeasies. Unsurprising, then, that I created a Cocktail Companion Guide to Resistance that readers can download for free here: www.instafreebie.com/free/1q8wq8

7. If you were on desert island with just one book to read, what would it be and why?

That is a very cruel scenario! Without my library of ficton and non-fiction, I guess it would have to be “How to successfully escape a desert island and make it back to civilisation”

8. Who is your go to celebrity crush?

Now this is a MUCH easier question to answer Supernatural’s Dean Winchester has been the inspiration for many of my characters. Even Seth, a character in Resistance (Divided Elements #1) took some initial inspiration from the hunter with a saviour complex. Supernatural is also my go-to binge watching fix when I’m stressing out about writing deadlines or immovable plot problems. Now, if you were throwing the box set of Supernatural episodes or even Dean Winchester himself into the desert island scenario, I might not be so worried about reading that book…

You can keep in touch with Mikhaeyla @:

www.kyrija.com/mikhaeyla-kopievsky

https://www.facebook.com/MikhaeylaKopievsky/

https://twitter.com/MikhaeylaK

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/32719178-resistance

Get Resistance the ebook @:

Amazon: (global link) http://mybook.to/DE1Resistance
Kobo: 
https://www.kobo.com/au/en/ebook/resistance-45
Nook: 
http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/resistance-mikhaeyla-kopievsky/1124987737
iBooks: 
https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/id1168636508

Get Resistance the paperback @:

Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Resistance-Divided-Elements-Book-1/dp/0995421854
Book Depository: 
https://www.bookdepository.com/Resistance-Mikhaeyl-Kopievsky/9780995421851
Booktopia: 
http://www.booktopia.com.au/resistance-mikhaeyla-kopievsky/prod9780995421851.html

One last thing I forgot to mention –

The official online launch for Resistance takes place on Saturday 4 February. There will be excerpt readings, an author Q&A, and special guests to talk about the development of the book’s cover art and discuss the themes of the book. Mikhaeyla would love to invite ll of you to attend – you can RSVP here (it’s an open invitation, so feel free to share with friends and family!)

#BookReview of Cluster of Lies by @SamMarquisBooks

cluster-of-liesCluster of Lies

by Samuel Marquis

Fiction: Thriller/Suspense/Environmental/Action. 326 Pages (PRINT). Mount Sopris Publishing (September 15, 2016)

five gold stars image

Author Biography

Samuel Marquis is a bestselling, award-winning suspense author. His books include “The Slush Pile Brigade,” “Blind Thrust,” “The Coalition,” and “Bodyguard of Deception.” He works by day as a VP–Hydrogeologist with an environmental firm in Boulder, Colorado, and by night as a spinner of historical and modern suspense yarns. He holds a Master of Science degree in Geology, is a Registered Professional Geologist in eleven states, and is a recognized expert in groundwater contaminant hydrogeology, having served as a hydrogeologic expert witness in several class-action litigation cases.

Book Description

In this second thriller in the Joe Higheagle Environmental Sleuth Series, mysterious deaths are taking place in the Rocky Mountain region outside Denver, Colorado. Joe Higheagle–a full-blooded Cheyenne geologist who has recently become an overnight celebrity for bringing down a billionaire corporate polluter–is hired to investigate Dakota Ranch, where four boys have recently died from a rare form of brain cancer, and Silverado Knolls, a glitzy soon-to-be-built development. He quickly finds himself entangled in an environmental cancer cluster investigation as well as a murderous conspiracy in which friend and foe are indistinguishable and a series of seemingly impenetrable roadblocks are thrown in his path.

Book Review

Cluster of Lies is a well plotted, fast paced, story of conscious versus greed. Marquis brings back Environmental Geologist Joseph Higheagle in what seems to be a simple case of reading reports and giving a high paying client his professional opinion, but if it were that simple, I wouldn’t be talking about it. Higheagle has to deal with some deep moments during the book that involve a lot of people. Keep quiet, go public, threaten, what should he do? The problems he faces involves a woman he’s falling for and her son that has developed cancer, most likely due to illegal dumping on the planned community they live in. Another problem is the man apparently responsible for it is the woman’s ex-lover.

Marquis gives us a great supporting cast with the telling of five main stories all linked together through Higheagle and the illegal waste dumping.

I liked Higheagles romantic interest and her son. It was a well used plot tool to discuss issues that one would want to know about while reading the book.

The antagonist of the book is more complex and disturbed than you think at first. Marquis surprised me with this one.

I read this one in about a day. It’s that fast paced and I think you’ll enjoy it.

Review by: Ronovan Hester

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#BookReview of Blind Thrust by @SamMarquisBooks

Blind Thrust by Samuel Marquis Cover imageBlind Thrust

by Samuel Marquis

Fiction: Thriller/Suspense/Environmental/Action. 307 Pages (PRINT). Mount Sopris Publishing (October 1, 2015)

five gold stars image

Author Biography

Samuel Marquis is a bestselling, award-winning suspense author. His books include “The Slush Pile Brigade,” “Blind Thrust,” “The Coalition,” and “Bodyguard of Deception.” He works by day as a VP–Hydrogeologist with an environmental firm in Boulder, Colorado, and by night as a spinner of historical and modern suspense yarns. He holds a Master of Science degree in Geology, is a Registered Professional Geologist in eleven states, and is a recognized expert in groundwater contaminant hydrogeology, having served as a hydrogeologic expert witness in several class-action litigation cases.

Book Description

Blind Thrust by Samuel Marquis is a suspense/thriller set in Colorado that paints a picture of what could happen when greed overrides common sense. That’s a simple way of saying it. But then, I’m a simple speaking kind of guy. Environmental Geologist Joseph Higheagle has a problem, keep his mouth shut and keep a nice paying job, or go with his conscience and do what’s right for thousands of people.

The choice might sound easy but when you factor in a billionaire bad guy, corrupt senators, evil security bad boys and a hired assassin sent to shut you up, you might think twice, at least.

Book Review

In this first Joseph Higheagle adventure Sam Marquis does a great job introducing the core of the main character, as well as his grandfather/father figure Chief John Higheagle, a retired lawyer who now lives with him and acts as his sounding board when the young Higheagle is faced with moral forks in the road.

Combine that with some great supporting characters like the EPA agent Nina Curry, a romantic interest for HIgheagle, the younger one, not the old chief, and the USGS director Nickerson and you have a great story that’s well developed and fast paced.

You might not think an environmental thriller would be very thrilling, but Marquis puts his years of experience as a geologist to work and it is very apparent in the technical speak that’s in the book. Sometimes that sort of becomes a bit heavy and repetitive but I see it as being legitimate to the conversations occurring.

One thing I like about the antagonists in a Marquis novel is that they are not one dimensional. You almost see the humanity side of them and in Blind Thrust it’s very apparent. Charles Quantrill is a powerful man that ends up in a situation that he never saw coming, but that doesn’t make it any better nor does it make him any less guilty.

I read this one in about two days. It’s that fast paced and I think you’ll enjoy it.

Review by: Ronovan Hester

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#Interview with @SamMarquisBooks of Bodyguard of Deception.

I recently had the pleasure of connecting with a great writer named Samuel Marquis, a #1 Bestselling Denver Post author, multi-award Samuel Marquis photowinning author, and hydrogeologist. Yes, you read that last one correctly. I think the strength of detail that last one brings to Sam’s personality is what makes his Historical Fiction so great to read. Okay, it’s ONE of the reasons. The other part is the fact he is just that good a writer. Ask James Patterson if you don’t want to believe me. Yes, THAT James Patterson.Bodyguard of Deception by Samuel Marquis image

After reading and reviewing his book Bodyguard of Deception, I just had to ask some questions. I restrained my total historian geek self and didn’t send a book of probing his way. The following are what made it through and back.

One of the things I always find interesting is where the inspiration for a book comes from. What sparked Bodyguard of Deception?

As a history aficionado who has always loved stories of the American West and World War Two, I have long wanted to write a novel that incorporated both of my research passions. That became possible when, several years ago, I read Ben Mcintyre’s Double Cross: The True Story of the D-Day Spies (2012) and Agent Zigzag: A True Story of Nazi Espionage, Love, and Betrayal (2007) along with Arnold Krammer’s eye-opening Nazi Prisoners of War in America (1996). Between these three well-crafted books, I learned about Double Cross and its cast of memorable British-controlled spies, while simultaneously discovering that, between 1943 and 1945, nearly a half million German prisoners were held in 511 POW camps across the United States, many of them in the American West.

Bodyguard of Deception grabbed my attention right from the beginning and never let go. The character development is excellent. Samuel Marquis has a knack for using historic details and events to create captivating and fun to read tales.”
—Roy R. Romer, 39th Governor of Colorado

It wasn’t long after digesting these three great historical reads that I envisioned a WWII spy novel that would be uniquely set in both the European theatre and my home state of Colorado. What came to me in my overactive filmographer’s head was a kind of Das Boot (The Boat) meets Eye of the Needle meets The Great Escape with a hint of Arthur Penn’s classic The Chase as well as The Fugitive thrown in for good measure. But I wanted another important twist that deviated from most WWII books and movies: I wanted my lead German to be a sympathetic character even though he was fighting for Hitler’s Nazi Germany.

I love to research. The amount of research you had to do for this book is staggering. You had to read at least 20x the amount of information just to write the least important real life character. I know you have a very intensive degree, one not related to World History at all, so what you’ve done amazes me, a historian. Do you have an affinity for research, and why history?

I’ve always loved history, especially the underdogs and iconoclasts of American history, and I voraciously read books about military history and intelligence, specifically related to the Golden Age of Piracy, Plains Indian Wars, World War II, espionage, and the War on Terror WWII. But what started it all is I grew up watching classic World War Two movies and Westerns with my dad like The Great Escape, The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly, The Dirty Dozen, The Wild Bunch, Where Eagles Dare, and Patton. These movies had a profound impact on me and the stories I have come to tell. Because of this, it should come as no surprise that my books have been compared to The Great Escape, Public Enemies, The Day of the Jackal, and old-time Westerns. One reviewer said of my WWII thriller, Bodyguard of Deception: “Marquis throws in everything but the kitchen sink.” I consider that not a criticism, but a badge of honor and tribute to me and my late father and the movies we watched together growing up. Bodyguard of Deception is currently a Top 10 Best World War II Spy Book and Top 10 Fiction Book Set During WWII on Goodreads along with such WWII thrillers as Follett’s Eye of the Needle and The Key to Rebecca, Daniel Silva’s The Unlikely Spy, and Ben Mcintyre’s Agent Zigzag and Double Cross.

“A promising thriller writer with a fine hero, great research, and a high level of authenticity.”
—Donald Maass, Author of Writing 21st Century Fiction

You’ve delved into an area of WWII history many Americans don’t even know existed. Some know about the Japanese-American internment camps, but some have no idea the US had German POWs here. Where did you get your research for that?

I read Arnold Krammer’s eye-opening Nazi Prisoners of War in America (1996), and from there, I read around thirty books and articles dealing with German POWS in America.  As stated in my response to Question #1 above, it is interesting that, between 1943 and 1945, nearly a half million German prisoners were held in 511 POW camps across the United States, many of them in the American West. POW internment camps like Camp Trinidad in Southern Colorado and Camp Papago Park in Phoenix, Arizona, were the scenes of exciting mass German escapes and FBI manhunts, forced POW labor to alleviate the drain of able-bodied workers fighting overseas, and internal battles and political murders between Nazi and anti-Nazi German prisoners.

Which character are you most like or identify the most with in Bodyguard of Deception?

Believe it or not, I like Katherine Templeton (the Countess von Walburg) the best. I like strong female characters. But because I am male, I am most like her son Erik, the German spy and escaped POW, and Colonel Morrison, the commandant of the fictional Camp Pershing. In my books, I make sure to care about, and even love, all of my characters, even the villains. You have to love your villains and show their good side, to make your readers uncomfortable and create dramatic tension.

You do a great job with descriptive writing. I can feel the cold of the nights and the heat of the days, as well as see the fanatical moments of some of the characters. I can see the craziness in the eyes of one certain character toward the end. What type of background do you have in writing? What kind of training to give you that touch?

I have written extensively since I was in high school, took several English classes in college at Denison University, and published over twenty articles on oil exploration, hydrogeology, and environmental contamination (I have an M.S. in geology) before I wrote my first novel. But it took me several years and three novels before I could pen professional-caliber thrillers. I have been at this for a few years and have had two New York literary agents. Now my first two thrillers, The Slush Pile Brigade and Blind Thrust, were #1 Denver Post bestsellers, and my first three books received multiple national book awards (USA Best Book Awards, Beverly Hills Book Awards, Next Generation Indie Book Awards, and Foreword Reviews’ Book of the Year).  In addition, my first four books garnered positive reviews from #1 bestseller James Patterson, Kirkus Reviews, and Foreword Reviews (5 Stars). But it took a hell of a lot of hard work and persistence to become a “bestselling, award-winning author.”

A woman plays a big part in the book. Sometimes we men don’t pull off writing women well. We forget to put in the nuances that make her a woman and not just a female name attached to our male dialogue and narrative. Did you take a lot of care to get that just right? Did you have help with beta-readers, editors, or anyone to tell you that you nailed it?

My wife is a professional book editor, and she is hard on me and makes sure I get my female characters right. The key is to have empathy for your characters and to constantly put yourself in their shoes. If you do that, I think the dialogue and character relationships will come out all right.

What is your novel writing process? By this, I mean from idea to book shelf, do you research, write, put it away, then rinse and repeat. Every author has a different way.

You just described it very well. My problem is that I have too many, not too few, book ideas and not enough time to turn them all into novels.

I love the book cover for Bodyguard of Deception. It is not overdone but gets everything needed across. Once into the story you get the meaning of it even more. How involved were you in its design? Who came up with it? Who did it?

My book cover designer is award-winning book designer George Foster (www.fostercovers.com), and I love what he does for my covers. He is a true professional and one of the best in the business. I give him a book synopsis, we talk about ideas for a half hour, and then I turn him loose and he does the rest.

With your job by day, writing by night, what hobbies does such a busy man indulge in? What shows do you binge watch? What’s the last good book you read?

I am an avid lacrosse player, downhill skier, and movie watcher. I played in the 2014 Lacrosse World Games and play lacrosse every weekend with most of the players half my age. I have a gift for “finishing”, which is another way of saying I can put the ball in the net. So I am a 54-year-old “Laxbro.”

Who would you like to see play your main characters in a movie or even a TV series?

Erik von Walburg – German Spy and Escaped German POW: Armie Hammer

Katherine von Walburg – German-born American ranch owner and owner of Broadmoor Hotel, mother of Erik: Cate Blanchett or Kristin Scott Thomas

Colonel Jack Morrison – American Colonel, Commandant of Camp Pershing: Jeff Bridges

Tam MacGregor – Scottish Colonel, Chief of the B1A counterintelligence section of British Military Intelligence Section 5 (MI5): Michael Fassbender

What was it like writing Hoover, considering all of the history we know about him?

During the war, Hoover actually played a large role in hunting down German spies and POWs. As director of the FBI and as a human being, Hoover was absolutely over-the-top, so I had to write him like that. At his heart, he was an overzealous law-and-order type guy, glory-seeker, and turf-protector, who was driven by an almost religious-like fervor to promote the FBI in any way possible, at the expense of other law enforcement agencies. But he was also crucial to the modernization and technical optimization of law enforcement that we see today on all the CSI shows.

Have you had any feedback from people that experienced the POWs in America?

Yes, Roy Romer, the former Governor of Colorado and DNC Co-Chairman, remembered the old German POWS in eastern Colorado from when he was a boy and said he enjoyed that aspect of the book. He was nice enough to give me the review for my front cover, too. It reads:

Bodyguard of Deception grabbed my attention right from the beginning and never let go. The character development is excellent. Samuel Marquis has a knack for using historic details and events to create captivating and fun to read tales.”

—Roy R. Romer, 39th Governor of Colorado

What is the project you are working on now?

I am beginning to do my final month-long edits on the second book in my Joe Higheagle Environmental Sleuth Series, The Cluster, a childhood cancer cluster mystery set in Colorado. The novel is based on my hydrogeological experience with the Rosamond cancer cluster in California. Think Erin Brokovich, Michael Clayton, and A Civil Action. In other words, my day job as an expert witness in groundwater cases, but with more diabolically-clever corporate bad guys and dangerous gunplay.

What inspires you to write?

I’ve always wanted to write and simply have to do it. I like to create memorable characters and tell wildly implausible stories that actually seem quite real.

 “The Coalition has a lot of good action and suspense, an unusual female assassin, and the potential to be another The Day After Tomorrow [the runaway best-seller by Allan Folsom].”
—James Patterson, #1 New York Times Best-Selling Author

You are on a deserted island and you can take only one book to read, what book would that be and why?

Lonesome Dove by Larry McMurtry. Because it’s my favorite book of all time, the best story ever told about the American West, and it’s nice and long.


Now you know a little more about Samuel Marquis. Go get his books. Now. Seriously. I can’t wait for Roman Moon, the next installment of the WWII Trilogy, to come out in January 2017.-Ronovan Hester, Interviewer

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My Grl by John Howell @HowellWave Interview

my girl coverReviewed by Faridah Nassozi for Readers’ Favorite – Rating – Five Stars

My GRL by John W. Howell is a fast-paced thriller that shows how your life can be turned upside down in the blink of an eye. John J. Cannon was looking forward to a long island vacation but instead ended up chasing and hiding from the bad guys. From losing Gerry who he was getting close to calling a friend, to discovering the real truth behind her death, to discovering who Sarah, Gerry’s friend really was. It is a well-written story that kept me glued, page after page. 

 

Anonymous Amazon Customer-Rating 5 star The author John W Howell has constructed his thriller very cleverly and created a truly pleasurable reading experience. I found myself suspecting just about everyone of something and being right only about half the time, which is probably in itself one of the marks of a very good thriller.

john howell author my girl

RW: John, what is your background in writing, what makes you a writer other than your ability to hold a pencil, type a writer or in some other way make words appear on a page?

JOHN: What really makes me a writer is I do it every day. Besides that, I have studied the craft and have written four books now. One published, one at the publisher for release (heaven knows when) and one just completed. The other one? Holding the laundry room door open in a breeze. (yes it is that bad)

RW: Where do you live and that will tell us how big that laundry room book needs to be?

JOHN: I was born in Detroit Michigan but have lived in Illinois, Indiana, Connecticut, Ohio, and California. I currently reside in Texas on a barrier island off the coast of South Texas 

RW: So you write all the time and live on an island. I always ask what an author does to get away from writing when they need a break from it, when it’s just frustrating them for the moment, I think I can guess yours but tell us anyway.

JOHN: I usually don’t take a break from writing. I do take a break from novel writing by doing short stories. When I really need to get away for a few I take a walk on the beach 

RW: Okay now into the real reason people are here. What is the title of your book and why did you choose that name?

JOHN: The title of the published book is My GRL. I choose the title since the story is about a guy who buys a boat and he names it My GRL.

RW: What genre does your book fall into?

JOHN: My GRL is a thriller.

RW: Why do you write thrillers?

JOHN: I find the Thriller genre open enough to allow me to create the kinds of situations that are interesting to the reader while challenging myself to insert the kinds to twists, turns and excitement the reader is looking for.

RW: Tell us a little about My GRL and what inspired the idea.

JOHN: John Cannon is a San Francisco Lawyer who wants to take a leave of absence from the firm. He buys a boat he names My GRL unaware a group of terrorists want to use his boat to destroy a symbol of America’s greatness. His first hint of trouble is when he wakes up in the hospital and learns he was found unconscious next to the young woman who sold him the boat in the first place. The only one standing between the terrorists and the successful completion of their mission is John Cannon.

I was on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier Lexington which is moored in Corpus Christi. My sister and I were touring the boat since our father had served on her as a naval aviator during World War II. I was struck to see all the armament was no longer in place. This symbol of America’s military might was defenseless to any attack. After leaving the boat, I constructed a story on how to attack the Lexington and then a story on how to prevent such a thing. The story of My GRL fell into place.

RW: Tell us about your John Cannon and also who you envision playing him in a movie.

JOHN: I think I would like to see Bradly Cooper play John. He has the kind of seriousness coupled with humor that is the essence of John’s personality. John J. Cannon is a normal person caught up in extraordinary circumstances. He is a guy who wants to become a charter captain and ends up having to deal with a bunch of pretty bad characters. John is not a superhero nor does he possess secret abilities that allow him to overcome his adversaries. He is slightly OCD and is worried about many of the same things that we all are. He has a dry sense of humor and his legal training allows him to keep a fairly even disposition while things around him become increasingly complex. He loves good food and is especially fond of a Tanqueray martini on the rocks

RW: What message do you think your book delivers to the reader?

JOHN: The basic message is people with a cause are convinced righteousness is on their side. The terrorists are firmly convinced that because of past offenses, their current plan to kill innocent people is just. So we cannot hope to convince these terrorists to give up their cause simply because we don’t think it is lawful. I would hope anyone reading this book would come away with the feeling that military solutions are not always the way to stop hostilities. It might take a deeper understanding of the motivation of the adversary to successfully come to a peaceful solution.

RW: Describe your book in one word.

JOHN: Intriguing

RW: What did you learn about yourself from writing this book?

JOHN: The first thing I learned was I could, in fact, finish a book that was readable. Up to this point my efforts were not what I would describe as stellar. The second was I could write about a subject that I knew little about. People who don’t know me think I have been around boats. I really had to research all aspects of the book since none of the hardware and software related items were in my experience profile.

RW: How did you end up with MSP?

JOHN: I did a number of queries and for whatever reason never connected. I then went and did some research on publishers who would accept a first-time author who did not have an agent and found Martin Sisters Publishing

RW: What is your biggest tip for someone to getting published?

JOHN: Too often, authors rush to get a book published with some disastrous results. The author must do the research necessary to find out how they want to be published. If they want to self-publish that carries one set of responsibilities. Traditional publish is another option but does have certain requirements. So my tip is to take the time necessary to determine the path that is right for the person. There is no real right path, but a path chosen that is done in haste could be very disappointing.

RW: When you’re not writing who are you reading?

JOHN: I am reading Allure of the GypsieS by Charles Yallowitz. It is his third story in the Legends of Windemere series. He has actually published five books, but I’m a little behind since my TBR pile gets higher by the day.

RW: Who are your favorite authors?

JOHN: I have three current favorites, Charles Yallowitz author of the Legends of Windemere series, Kevin Brennan Author of Yesterday Road and Occasional Soulmates and Andra Watkins author of Not Without My Father: One Woman’s 444-Mile Walk of the Natchez Trace and To Live Forever: An Afterlife Journey of Meriwether Lewis.

RW: How do you like to keep hydrated?

JOHN: I love to drink water while working and a margarita after. 

RW: What are you working on right now?

JOHN: I have finished the third book in the John Cannon trilogy and it has a working title of Our Justice. The next book explores the daughter father conflict in a world filled with bad choices. We’ll have to see how it works.

My second book in the John J. Cannon Trilogy is titled His Revenge. It is the story of John’s efforts to bring the terrorist leader to justice with the help of the FBI. The title is a little bit confusing in that we are not sure whose revenge is eventually satisfied Johns or the Terrorist leader? When the book is launched the answer will be apparent to the reader.

RW: What is your favorite word?

JOHN: Impecunious.(poor) I loved the word ever since studying for the GMAT. I used to love to say “In my current state of impecunity ….” I could then beg off anything. 

Acquire My GRL at:
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Make sure to CONNECT with JOHN at:
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Living on an island, writing and walking on a beach? John, you’ll have a visitor soon. Ah, the dream life. And John, I have plenty of door holders so pick that one up, dust it off and get to revising it.

As always . . .

Read a Book, Write a Review.

Ron_LWI

@RonovanWrites

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Relating to John’s suggestion about knowing your path and role in traditional and self-publishing, check out Choose Your Publishing Option. Free for ebook or pdf at Smashwords here.

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Blind Marsh @OliverFChase Q&A

oliver_chase_marsh_island.jpgMarsh Island was released November 2013 and is available from Amazon, B&N, Smashwords, publisher AEC Stellar, and me via webpage oliverchase.net. The publisher decided to re-release the novel to coincide with the sequel’s release referenced below.

Blind Marsh sequel and final novel in Hirebomber Crime Series will release December 11, 2014 and oliver_chase_blind__marsh.jpgbe launched on Facebook November 13, 2014. Advanced electronic copies are available now for preorder from Amazon, B&N, and from Smashwords. Paper is available now via AEC Stellar and me via the website oliverchase.net.

 

 

Those in the mood for an armchair adventure won’t be able to put this one down. Oliver Chase’s mystery thriller, “Marsh Island” is a page-turner. Chase writes with a refreshing style in the genre of Sanford and Burke…

The main character is very easy to relate to, although at times he is a bit frustrating. I found myself mentally shouting at him, warning him not to trust people and not to be so gullible. Chase only gives a few moments of the villain’s point of view, but they are extremely intriguing…

Ollie’s comment: Wait for Blind Marsh where the villain confronts Phil. The world demands a life be taken.

Marsh Island is a thriller to its core. It’s twists and turns kept me reading, searching for answers. The storyline kept me turning to the next page, only to become more determined to find the answer. Page after page, Mr. Oliver had my heart racing, and my adrenaline coursing through my body, watching and waiting to see what came next…

 

What to say about my guest today? Things you won’t hear about today are things like “Distinguished Flying Cross” as a Marine Pilot, or 22 years in the FBI on dark missions. No those aren’t things discussed today, nor the hard to understand neighbors of Louisiana. Cajuns perhaps? I’ve worked with a few and have to say, I know a little Cajun French, but there are female readers present, so never mind. What makes today’s guest qualify to write the books mentioned today? As I went through the questions and my guest answered I pictured a relaxed and casual setting as he leaned against his little Grumman Tiger airplane and memories were recalled and excitement rose about the forthcoming book release. Now it’s time for you to feel that same thing as you meet . . .

Author

Oliver Chase

oliver_chase_author

 

RW: You grew up in the military, calling yourself a Military Dependent and not the commonly used Military Brat, for obvious reasons, tell us about that life and how it shaped Oliver Chase?
OLIVER: I grew up on military bases throughout the country from California to North Carolina. What a great place to be a kid – safe, communal, and social. I didn’t miss a thing from a traditional school setting. The friends I made in elementary school usually showed up again in Junior High. High School was a like a reunion of old pals from years gone by with new friends to be made.
We always seemed to know one another, one another’s friend, and best of all, we knew the little girl on roller skates with skinned knees in fourth grade that grew up to be our Homecoming Queen. I’ve read about the meanness in some kid’s life when it came to school. That was not how we grew up in the military.
I was also one of the rare kids whose dad had a short, one-time tour in the civilian world when I was a sophomore and junior in high school – convertibles, drive-in movies, and lovely ladies on roller skates serving shakes at my local hang outs for almost two years. We even had our own Wolfman Jack wannabe that played rock and roll songs, took requests, and spoke with a gravelly voice, just like in the movie. What a great hiatus from the button-down world of the military and just what a “rebellious” teenager needed.
There was a time when I had this teensy-weensy problem with the truth. I can’t tell you in how many versions, George and his cherry tree were explained to me. Of course, I grew up and not only found the value of honesty, but discovered I liked being in groups of honest people. There is no honor amongst thieves or liars, and I like honor.
In all my growing up however, I never lost my yearning to spin a good tale. I think engaging a reader in a fictional story and letting the author speak to his personal beliefs is the height of literary actualization and honesty.

RW: I think it’s somewhat obvious with the adage of ‘write what you know’ why you write about mystery thrillers with a touch of politics and airplanes but I always ask this of my guests, how did you come to writing and why do you write in the genre that you do?
OLIVER: I began by reading historical novels like The Source, Battle Cry, The Right Stuff, Space, Exodus, and Hawaii. I’d spend time in school away from my math and science books just to disappear into the world of James Michener and Leon Uris. My grades didn’t do well until I discovered Pulp Novels like Ray Bradbury, H.P Lovecraft, and Dashiell Hammett. Now I could stick a whole book into the back pocket of my jeans, and read a chapter or a few paragraphs on the bus, between classes, and in study hall…not to mention the occasional all-nighter or until the flashlight batteries gave out. Pulp novels are what I write now. The only difference is that we call them mystery noir. I like mystery thrillers, techno thrillers, and political thrillers. There’s a pattern here, I think.

RW: You told me Marsh Island is a real place in Louisiana, where you reside now, tell us about your Hirebomber Crime Series starring Phil Pfeiffer, your protagonist.
OLIVER: In Marsh Island, Army Ranger Phil Pfeiffer is left for dead in the opening days of the Gulf Wars. He’s found by wandering Iranian tribes people, severely injured and the lone survivor of a secret mission. Phil is released from the Army and decides upon the simpler life of a private investigator skip tracing and catching cheating husbands. Simple that is, until he is hunted by the mob, pursued by a psychotic hit man, and stalked by deep water sharks. He must shadow box a bizarre and dangerous world of false clues and thousand year old prophecies to survive. In the sequel Blind Marsh, Phil agrees to protect the lounge singer we met in the first book from an unpredictable ex-boyfriend and his gangster family. Let the love sparks fly. Struggling with his own demons and disappointments, Phil survives a Wild West shootout and uncovers a plot we knew was brewing in that pesky first book. Phil uncovers the theft of a trillion dollar industry and weighs his own life against that of the killer. He chooses to take both when true evil is disclosed.

RW: I think knowing of your Military and FBI background I read at OliverChase.net where some of what went into your books but what inspired you to actually write them?
OLIVER: Many people have given their lives over our short history to stop tyranny and injustice. I see these individuals as the foundation for our country and our beliefs. The key in my books however is not the involvement of the mass, but individual strong men and women unwilling to compromise their values in a vanilla world of common music, social blandness, and popular thinking. If you believe that singular acts cannot change the flow of history, just look at a generation of strong moms and dedicated fathers that said no to genocide, apartheid, dictators, and even teenage drinking. A single man or a woman can change our world. We can take that to the bank.

RW: Tell us about your main characters and what you think will them connect to readers.
OLIVER: Phil Pfeiffer was described by a reviewer as an everyday man, flawed like many of us, but called upon to test the strength of his beliefs. Our heroine in Blind Marsh made her choices in life, too – some good and some not so good. They set themselves apart by choosing to overcome adversity with character and sometimes, raw guts. Greatness is not just the province of the historical figures; greatness resides in all when we choose.

RW: What message do you think your book delivers to the reader?
OLIVER: I’d like to believe many of us see ourselves as something other than ants working in the pile. Whether that’s true or not, I like stories about strong people caring for their comrades, delivering lunches to the shut-ins, or teaching kids to swim at the YMCA. We have a potential to make life better for others. Service doesn’t take away from strength but delivers it, and makes us more than just soldiers, laborers, or even ant-queens.

RW: Writers inevitably put something of themselves in their work, what do you discover about yourself when writing?
OLIVER: More than I’m probably willing to admit. My first book was written a couple decades ago and resides in my closet. Sometimes on a cold, uninspired mornings I’ll drag it out and read. I’m always surprised by again meeting the people I used to know– real and imagined. Most are compilations of persons from my past in cramped and scary airplane cockpits, hiding under flimsy roofs during rocket attacks, or with a badge walking the dark streets in a city already several hours asleep. I tell their stories even if they never quite recognize themselves from my words.

RW: Describe your book in one word.
OLIVER: Rollicking

RW: Where can we get your book now?

For paper, Southern Bound Bookstore in Biloxi and Bay Books in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi; Amazon (of course); and B&N by mail.

Contacting me through my webpage oliverchase.net will “net” you a signed copy for same charge as Amazon. As I indicated earlier, I’m between books at the moment and have a little time to connect more personally with a reader.

Electronically, add Smashwords and KOBO to the nationals mentioned above.

One great thing Oliver is doing is his Book Launch for Blind Marsh on his facebook page. It is coming up October 13-15.
Oliver gave us some great answers and I think you can get a full understanding of what went into his books, but now let’s look at bit at what is Oliver Chase. Yes I said what, not who.

“I like modern day thriller mystery writers like Craig Johnson, Tom Clancy, James Lee Burke, and Stephen King. I cut my teeth on James Michener, Herman Wouk, Tom Wolfe, Leon Uris, and Ernest Hemingway. Didn’t we all? Don’t let me forget Lee Harper, Susan Sontag, and Lorraine Hansberry. All very influential in my life and my writing. You know something? I never realized how powerful they were until I cranked out my first book Western Sunrise. All I knew was they told great stories making me regret that I’d turned the last page. I hope readers of Marsh Island and Blind Marsh feel the same way.”
“I like a cup of coffee when it’s cold outside; hot tea (orange pekoe) to follow if I’m still in the mood. In hot weather, I like cold tea in the morning after my workout.”
“When I’m full of ideas, I write. I believed Stephen King when he said write, write, and write. When I’m just full with myself, I run or swim.”

Upcoming from Oliver Chase.

Levant Mirage is waiting the editor’s red pen in November 2014 and will see light in the winter of 2015 as a new release. The novel is twist away from my noir mystery style and is a techno thriller with a threatened dystopian plot. Borne from my days at NASA, Islamic terrorists see and take the opportunity for final Jihad when our country dissolves the Constellation heavy lift rocket program and gives away the technology.

 

In The Joshua Tree, a bright political and personal future beckons Scott McHale, newly elected junior senator from California. Some whisper about a run for the presidency after Scott puts in few years to calm and mature a headstrong and driven personality. When politics conflict between kingmaker and prince however, a rift is irrevocable and a murder results. Survival is in the hands of those Scott loves when the world and the fickle press turn against him. The Joshua Tree will be completed in the Fall of 2015 just in time for the Presidential Election and will be a first draft product of the NaNoWriMo challenge this year. Only do this challenge once, however. There are eleven more months in every year. http://nanowrimonomo.com/

 

I’ve also written a screen treatment of Marsh Island based on Craig Johnson’s successful Walt Longmire model. The publisher will get his first installment in December 2014 after percolating in my desk drawer for a couple of months.

 

RW:I know you don’t have an agent but would be open to one at some point but tell us about AEC Stellar. I’ve had experience with another of your members Shannon A. Thompson of Take Me Tomorrow, and she was a great interview just like you have been.
OLIVER: The group writes in the thriller, YA, paranormal, Sci-Fi, and romance ilk. Inside our limited population, we help with Advanced Readings, reviews, launches, and critiques…and we do occasionally take one another to the woodshed when its warranted. I’ve been there and am better for the experience. Our publisher formulated a unique business model by offering printing and formatting services, editors, and publicists. We choose inside or outside the Community when we want the service. Most importantly, AEC introduced us to each other so that we can learn, grow, and spread our literary wings safely, and where jealousy and ego have no place.

RW: If you could have written any book that exists, other than your own, what would it be and why?
OLIVER: 11-22-63 by Stephen King
I’ve read the book twice, and examined the craftsman’s work often. King is a master yarn spinner, and his time travel adventure is one of the best examples of Sci-Fi and Thriller rolled into one. I liked the fantasy in The Stand and The Dome, too. In 11-22-63, King stayed historically close enough and strayed sufficiently in fiction to keep me riveted. Quite a good balancing act and worthy of multiple reads. Hey, Stephen. I taught, too and appreciated your comments on the youthful ineptitude we once brought to class. I just hope the kids survived and didn’t listen to me.

RW: What is your favorite word?
OLIVER: Insipid
Don’t you just love a description of something dull and uninspiring? As a sometime personal provider of insipid first impressions, I like when characters break out and prove others wrong.

 

Ronovan

Ron_LWI

 

 

 

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