Mercer Street #bookreview @johnheldt

  • Title: Mercer Street
  • Author: John A. Heldt
  • Print Length: 431
  • Publication Date: October 21, 2015
  • Sold by Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • Formats:  Kindle, audiobook
  • Goodreads
  • Genres: Historical Fiction, Romance

Mercer Street is the second book of John A, Heldt’s American Journey five-part series. Like the rest of the books, it’s not required to be read in order. I started off with the third novel, Class of ’69. I quickly became a fan of Heldt’s writing and couldn’t wait for more. I was glad this one didn’t disappoint.

Now that I’ve read all five, in this second book, I’ve noticed a lot of similarities with the other novels, such as repetition in the dialogue between characters, which made me begin skimming. Although it’s the second book in the series, it’s the fifth one I’ve read, and reading some of the dialogue became tedious. That said, I don’t plan on subtracting any points from the book because I truly enjoyed the story that was weaved together.

Professor Geoffrey Bell and his wife, Jeanette are the only characters that remain in each of the books. I like them, particularly Geoffrey. They aren’t present much, which is a shame but understandable. They are the keepers of a time traveling tunnel built by Bell’s distant relative, Percival Bell. Every so often, they choose people as a guinea pig of sorts to travel to certain parts of the past using this tunnel. The way the return is by use of a magnificent crystal.

In Mercer Street, Susan Peterson travels with her mother, Elizabeth, and daughter, Amanda, to the year 1938, to Princeton, New Jersey. There, the trio gets swept up in love, honor, and heartbreak as they embark on a journey of a lifetime.

As usual, the story line is intriguing and fun to read. Heldt does an amazing job with his research to make this story believable. Of course, with any story messing with events of the past, anything can happen. I’m sure if you had the opportunity to walk into yesteryear, you’d be tempted to make the most of it. You’d want to make new friends with amazing people, even fall in love….after all, the heart wants what the heart wants. And just like any story messing with events of the past, even the smallest change may have major consequences that could impact the current times.

I won’t say whether it did or didn’t in this book. That’s the fun part of turning the pages until you’ve reached the end. Mercer Street is a light, clean read, one that you can’t put down.

Overall rating: 5 out of 5 stars

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Biography

John A. Heldt

John A. Heldt is the author of the critically acclaimed Northwest Passage and American Journey series. The former reference librarian and award-winning sportswriter has loved getting subjects and verbs to agree since writing book reports on baseball heroes in grade school. A graduate of the University of Oregon and the University of Iowa, Heldt is an avid fisherman, sports fan, home brewer, and reader of thrillers and historical fiction. When not sending contemporary characters to the not-so-distant past, he weighs in on literature and life at johnheldt.blogspot.com.

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The Frihet Rebellion #bookreview

  • Title: The Frihet Rebellion
  • Author: Neil Davies
  • Print Length: 224
  • Publication Date: March 21, 2017
  • Sold by Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • Formats:  Kindle, Paperback
  • Goodreads
  • Genres: Science Fiction, Fantasy

Wow! This was an amazing read. It’s hard to write up a brief summary of what this book is about because there was so much going on. It opens with bodies falling, bullets flying and it doesn’t stop there. I’ve read a lot of science fiction novels and I have to say this is one of my favorites. So much blood was shed during the course of this book as the world of Frihet rebelled against Earth. Earth’s only chance for victory is the alien ship Spearhead, run by Joniskyredread, a Sklalen, who we refer to simply as Jon, and his human friend, Bryant Johnson.

There are a lot of characters throughout this book and they all seem to pop out from the pages. There are obvious evil ones, good ones and the ones we don’t know whether or not we can trust. No matter which side they’re on, the characters are to be remembered. In reference to Jon, though, I sometimes had a hard time keeping in mind that he was an alien. We’re reminded of his gray skin now and again; however, being referred to as Jon throughout most of the book just made him seem human.

The writing was tight and well done. I almost heard the war going on within the safety of my own home. My biggest issue was the POV. I noticed it especially toward the ending that we’re in one character’s POV and suddenly we know what the other is thinking or feeling. I don’t think it happened too often earlier on but it’s possible I overlooked it because I was too engrossed in the tale. It’s also possible it was meant to be that way in order to help the speedy pace. Either way, I prefer to focus on one person’s mind. Additionally, what really gnawed at me were the use of characters’ thoughts. I like it when authors italicize the thinking so it’s kept separate from the narration. This author didn’t do that. There were a lot of times when it’s a lone sentence in a paragraph, making it first person. After that one sentence, the narration would continue a new paragraph in its usual third person, until a short paragraph later, it’s back with a lone sentence in the first. It just struck me as awkward. But still, I rate this book as amazing. I feel any science fiction fan or any war lovers would enjoy this book. It’s a thrill ride you need to buckle up for.

Overall Rate: 5 out of 5 stars

Biography

Neil Davies

Born in 1959 and getting older by the hour, Neil Davies writes Horror and Science Fiction. When not writing books, he likes to write and record music with his son, as The 1850 Project, and paint. His favourite authors are, in no particular order, Richard Laymon, Steve Gerlach, Arthur C Clarke, Frank Herbert, H Rider Haggard, Guy N Smith, H G Wells, Bram Stoker, Dennis Wheatley, Connie Willis, Edgar Rice Burroughs, Graham Masterton, Sax Rohmer… with more being added all the time. His favourite musicians include Nightwish, Nils Lofgren, Kansas, Led Zeppelin, Prince, Cat Stevens, Jimi Hendrix, My Chemical Romance, King Crimson, Yes, Spock’s Beard, Gentle Giant and lots more. In art he admires the cover work of Chris Foss and Bruce Pennington, and maintains a healthy dislike of modern and abstract art. He’s still writing and refuses to stop however much people ask him to. Expect more published works soon.

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A Taste For Love #bookreview

  • Title: A Taste For Love
  • Author: Cathy Padilla
  • Print Length: 344
  • Publisher: Clean Reads
  • Publication Date: April 18, 2017
  • Sold by Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • Formats:  Kindle
  • Goodreads
  • Genres: Romance

Sarah is a young, strong-willed woman who is nothing if not loyal to her family and friend. She’d been hurt in the past, which resulted in her fear of falling in love, so she vows to avoid it. When she meets Luke Patterson, it’s an instant affection. They connect on a level which surprises her and she finds herself at ease whenever he’s around. While she’s struggling with unwanted feelings for Luke, she finds herself blackmailed by another man into an engagement to save her family’s honor and their land. Luke, on the other hand, has his own secret to protect. While he works to save the woman he loves from sacrificing everything, he tries to help her overcome her fear of love.

A Taste of Love is an excellent, fun to read on the beach novel by Cathy Padilla. The story was well-written and the scenes were clean, meaning there were no erotica or bad language, which was good.

Throughout most of the book, I was hoping to find more of a fault to Luke. He seemed a little too perfect; however, I still liked the character and wished there were men just like him. Sarah, though set in her ways, bounced around whether or not she should trust Luke. After her past dealings with love, it’s understandable. However, at times, I just wanted to tell her to take a deep breath and calm herself. A few parts in the story, character-wise, I didn’t care much for. One time Sarah wanted a friend to find out what the statute of limitations to murder was. Maybe it’s just me as a mystery writer/fanatic but I thought it was a crazy thing to ask. There were a few other brief scenes such as that that struck out as weird. Thankfully they didn’t stay in my mind as I continued to read.

My biggest issue in the story was the point of view changes. However, I later found out after reading the novel that it was meant to be in the omniscient point of view. There was a scene when it’s mainly Sarah’s POV and she’s talking on the phone with her Aunt Laura, we know that Laura winks at her sister, although Sarah obviously can’t see her. I normally prefer to know what’s inside one person’s head during a particular scene because at times ended up confusing me. However, I ultimately decided to overlook POV changes because I enjoyed the story.

While I did figure out some of the plot points, there were one or two which shocked me toward the end. I would certainly enjoy reading more romance from this author. I believe she has the ability to go from being good to great. It’s one of those sweet novels where you turn the pages and realized you’ve spent hours reading when it only feels like a few minutes.

Overall Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

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