Review of ‘Wise Before Their Time’ by Ann Richardson & Dietmar Bolle

‘Wise Before Their Time’ by Ann Richardson and Dietmar Bolle was first published in 1992 and focuses on the everyday lives of people suffering with HIV/AIDS.  Victims talk about how they found out about their disease, their thoughts and feelings at the time of diagnosis, and the effect the HIV diagnosis had on their immediate families.   You can check it out by clicking the worldwide link here:  http://bookShow.me/B0762QGY83  

Reading it over 25 years later it’s plain to see how ignorant the public were at that time regarding not only HIV/AIDS, but also how victims of the disease were treated.  There are heartbreaking stories of people losing their livelihoods once they admit they are HIV positive.  However, the book is not all doom and gloom – there are many inspirational stories here from sufferers who feel very well and enjoy living life to the full.

Of course these days, treatment options have increased the lifespan for the majority of HIV sufferers, and being HIV positive is not necessarily the death sentence it once was.  AIDS victims were always in the news back in 1992, but a quarter of a century later it’s hardly mentioned at all. 

Recommended for those who would like to delve a little bit into the early days of HIV/AIDS. 

Ann Richardson writes about different subjects that interest her.  You can check out the rest of Ann’s books by clicking the link below to her Amazon author page:

 https://www.amazon.com/Ann-Richardson/e/B001KCPSC2/

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Contemporary poetry I commend to you

I have been reading poetry lately, not the Whitman, Cummings or Oliver but of contemporary poets, many of whom shared their creations first on social media before making it to traditional publication.

Who hasn’t heard of New York Times bestselling author, Rupi Kaur with Milk and Honey (2014),  her debut collection of poetry and prose collection of poems, and the recent The Sun and Her Flowers (2017).  Both books address the ebb and flow of life – triumph and loss, joy and hurt, trauma and healing – in essence tracing the universality of the human condition.

Rupi Kaur, Milk and Honey

Then there is the works of Lang Laev, born to Cambodian parents in a refugee camp in Thailand and raised in Sydney. She is the author of 5 collections of poems and prose, the most successful being Lullabies (2014) and Love and Misadventure (2013).  Her other collections include Memories (2015), The Universe of Us (2016) with Sea of Strangers due 9 Jan 2018.  As you may guessed from the titles of her books, Lang Laev‘s poems traced her journey in family, love and loving again. I thoroughly enjoyed her writing – her quirky sense and approach to everyday happenings.

Lang Laev, Memories

Incidentally, Lang Laev now lives in New Zealand with her partner, Michael Faudet, also a poet. I discovered Michael’s work Bitter Sweet Love (2016) separate from Lang and it was a fascinating realisation that they are partners-in-crime 🙂  Michael Faudet‘s poems and prose are confronting and verge on the sensual and erotic.  After all he does have a curated erotic Tumblr. On the personal front, Michael Faudet is a mystery in that while he is everywhere on social media, little is known of this Kiwi poet and artist. His other works include Dirty Pretty Things (2014) and Smoke and Mirrors (2017) which is on my wishlist.

Michael Faudet, Bitter Sweet Love

Michel Faber is another poet which I stumbled across in a Sydney book store, his book Undying: A Love Story (2016) that is. Award winning author of 9 other books, this is Michel Faber’s first poem collection written while accompanying his wife through her journey from diagnosis to her passing from cancer. Heart wrenching and entirely beautiful, they chronicle love and despair, anger and sorrow.

Michel Faber, Undying: A Love Story

Finally, an insightful gift Neon Soul (2017) by Alexandra Elle.  The author writes with a rebel spirit, her poems speaking of healing  and positive affirmations, instead of pain which fueled much of contemporary poems.

Alexandra Elle, Neon Soul

There you are, five poets worth checking out. especially  if you are looking for something different and/or accessible.

Enjoy!

~ FlorenceT

© 2018 LitWorldInterviews

Em Dash or Ellipsis

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Image Courtesy Pixabay

An ellipsis is three or four dots with spaces in between . . . and an em dash is a long dash, usually made by typing two single (en) dashes — next to each other, usually with no spaces between them and their adjoining words. They are called en or em because of their lengths, m being longer than n. En dashes are usually used as hyphens within particular words, and em dashes are used either within sentences or at the ends of them.

Not all authors have formal degrees in English, and most certainly, not many readers do either. Readers and book clubs that aren’t also writers are very unlikely to have lengthy debates about the correct use of em dashes and ellipses. Unless something is particularly jarring to a reader, they aren’t going to care whether any particular use of an em dash is grammatically sound or not, as long as they continue to enjoy the book they’re reading. I’ve spoken to several “normal” readers on the subject and most of them told me that they’d never thought about it, quite a few said that they preferred the use of only one or the other throughout any book, while two (out of thirty) said that while it didn’t overly bother them or spoil their reading experience, they were very occasionally aware that maybe an ellipsis would have been better than an em dash or vice versa.

From a formatting perspective, I’ve always preferred the use of one or the other—it just looks cleaner to me, because I know that only a few people, if any, will be mortally offended by this, but from an editing point of view, this has always made me feel guilty. Because I do proof the work of others as well as my own, I now go for the correct usage unless otherwise instructed by the author. Most Indies go for one or the other, but maybe we should rethink that route now. With most self-publishing authors wanting their books to be better than their traditionally published counterparts, we should try not to leave ourselves open to any criticism if we can avoid it. Maybe we should mix things up a little with our dots and dashes after all.

The short clue here is that unless used within a sentence where they will be more effective than commas or other marks, the em dash signals an abrupt or normal stop, whereas the ellipsis conveys either a little more time between the adjoining words, or the fact that words are missing. When it comes to the end of sentences, the em dash is more effective if the words are cut off abruptly or interrupted. They could be abruptly cut off if the speaker suddenly realised that they shouldn’t be saying what they are. The story would go on from there nicely without any reader confusion, so what comes before and after should flow. If the speaker has been interrupted the next sentence will indicate that. If the sentence is finished off in a dreamy sort of way, then possibly the ellipsis is your go to. It all depends on how you want your reader to “hear” what your characters are saying.

Within sentences—I like to use em dashes rather than parentheses (brackets) to expand on any particular point. If your speaker wants to insert something for emphasis also, I like the use of the em dash, but if he is stammering or missing words then the ellipsis might convey that better. Ellipses should definitely be used where you are leaving words out of a quoted sentence. Obviously the ways in which these things can be used exceed my couple of pointers here, and as I said, we writers can have tendencies to get a little bull-headed when we prefer one thing over another–whether “wrong” or “right” in the views of others.

The written English language is often very different in different parts of the world today. You get UK English, US English, Australian English, and so on, and some people get quite hot under the collar about correct usage of words.

Different editors favour different styles too. Grammar is grammar and not generally alright to take too many liberties with, but in this particular instance I think that personal choice works well if the words convey what the author wants them to convey. Unless of course every paragraph has lots of unended or breaks in sentences—then correct usage is definitely the way to go.

Happy 2018 fellow scribblers!

@FTThum #BookReview ‘Awaken A New Myth’ by Karen La Puma

I was provided a complimentary copy of this soon-to-be published book in exchange for an honest review.

Title:          Awaken A New Myth: Goddess Warrior on the Hero’s Journey
Author:        Karen La Puma
To be published:     Soul Source (10 Jan 2018)
Format:          Paperback
Pages:             204
Genre:           Non-Fiction – Spiritual

 

 

What’s it about?

“Awaken a New Myth” is the first of 10 spiritual books (A Toolkit of Awakening Series) Karen La Puma has written after nearly 3 decades as an astrologer, hypnotherapist, reiki master and spiritual counsellor.

Weaving the work of Carl Jung, particularly of the Collective Unconscious and archetypes, and Joseph Campbell, in his mythological exploration of the hero’s journey, Karen La Puma proposes a new way of being.

“Awaken a New Myth” entreats readers to discover our light, to have courage to take this journey of discovery. It is premised on our belonging together as a greater Whole. The book is divided into 4 parts (Overviewing the Journey, Answering the Call, Appreciating the Positive and Discovering Purposeful Living) which mirrors the 12 stages of Joseph Campbell’s mythic structure of the Hero’s journey, the journey though taken embodied as the Warrior Goddess.

The abstract language La Puma used can be inaccessible to readers new to the spiritual path, predominantly undefined terms except for the Glossary towards the end.

The use of italicized words and capitalized abstract nouns (eg. Archetypes, Source, Essence, True Nature, Love, Divine, Being) are distracting and confusing, as I attempted to fully grasp their meaning as La Puma intended them. Perhaps it is La Puma’s intention to leave her message abstract and open to her readers’ subjective interpretation?

Awaken a New Myth is a book of ideas, rather than a theoretical exposition. It is a book with heart, and to engage the mind, greater depth is required. Nevertheless, La Puma puts forth her model of the “Goddess Warrior Magnetically Creating the Hero’s Journey” as the “answer for these quickening times, because we now have the ability, the map, and the keys to awaken and co-create a better world”.

Despite the language perhaps more suited to those already on spiritual and mythical paths, the message is a call to live authentically with a willingness to step up to our best self.

As a self-help book, Awaken a New Myth poses many reflective questions to guide readers on the Warrior Goddess’ Hero Journey which readers dedicated to the practice will find insightful answers, and for whom this resonates, a new way of being.

 

My rating:                  2.5/5

~ FlorenceT

@FTThum
MeaningsAndMusings

© 2018 LitWorldInterviews

Happy New Year!

All of us here at LWI wish you a prosperous and productive year ahead filled with lots of happy writing and reading of new and wonderful things.

 

HNYLWI