#Book #Review A Journey to Happiness (Passage to Thailand) by Paloma Caral. A journey to the depths of consciousness

A journey to happiness  (Passage to Thailand)by Paloma Caral
A journey to happiness (Passage to Thailand)by Paloma Caral

Hi all:

Before my review I wanted to share a word of clarification. I have a personal connection with the book I’m reviewing today. I have translated it to English. I have no commercial stake in the sale of the book (I’ve provided the translation but don’t share in the sales) but wanted you to know that my review (that I’m not posting in official sites as I appear in the credits) is a translation of my review of the Spanish version of the book as I wouldn’t dare comment on my own work. I try to be as unobtrusive as I can when translating as I want the final result to be as close as possible to the original. So any faults you might find with the book will probably be mine and the merits are Paloma’s.

And without further ado…

A journey to happiness (Passage to Thailand)

  • File Size:948 KB
  • Print Length:184 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage:Unlimited
  • Sold by:Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language:English
  • ASIN:B00UXZH6DG

A journey to the depths of consciousness

The title of this novel describes it perfectly. Initially the story is presented from the pont of view of Sara, a young woman who decides to start taking classes at a martial arts school, although what she is trying to do is to find herself. Marc, one of the teachers of the school feels a special affinity for Sara from the very beginning and knows that she needs somebody to help her.

But, although the story returns to Sara, the main part of the novel follows Marc, who discovers many family secrets he wasn’t aware of, including a young half-sister, Carlota, who accompanies him in his journey to Thailand.

His journey to a temple in Chiang Mai, is also ours. Through the narration of several of the characters, including the abbot of the temple, and later a young novice, we learn the story of the Buddha and some of his ideas. The reflections and reactions of the characters, especially those of Carlota, help us question and explore Buddhist philosophy, and at the same time provide us with a human and emotional centre. Carlota is a girl confronted by a situation that would be terrible and cruel at any age who grows and discovers that you make your own happiness.

Marc goes from being an intuitive and “good” man to a man who reaches enlightenment and becomes a master of more than just martial arts, and the father of a unique family.

And to complete the transformation, Sara also goes in search of her own happiness and I found her adventure truly inspiring.

This is not a novel full of action and drama, but a reflective novel where ideas and philosophy are at a premium. The psychological portraits of the characters help us live the story and experiment in the first person their discoveries and revelations.

If you’re only looking for action, romance and standard adventures, I don’t recommend you this novel. But if you dare to go embark on a journey exploring ideas and confronting prejudices, I recommend you this book by Paloma Caral, an author whom you should follow closely. She’ll open up the doors of your mind and your spirit.

The Spanish version of the book has been on the best-sellers list for over a year now.

Ratings:
Realistic Characterization: 4/5
Made Me Think: 5/5
Overall enjoyment: 4.5/5
Readability: 4/5
Recommended: 4.4/5
Overall Rating: 4.5/5
 

Buy it at:  Amazon
Format & Pricing:
Kindle: $3.04

Olga Núñez Miret

@OlgaNM7

http://OlgaNM.wordpress.com

http://www.OlgaNM.com

Should Indie Authors Self-Censor Their Books?

Indie authors get to publish anything at all. Traditional authors have their work edited – things get taken out. Probably things that could cause offense, as well as typos and grammar gremlins. Should you self-censor your writing because of the possibility of offending someone with a word or deed, and thereby open yourself to a couple of raging negative reviews? No – you never should. I must admit to a lot of hesitation inserting offensive things back when I first started out, but not anymore. I’ll write what I feel is right for the story whether it could offend or not. It’s fiction after all. There are things in all my books that could offend a wide range of readers if they chose to be offended, but I have more than enough respect for most lovers of the written word to realise that they’re generally intelligent and open minded, and that if they know that certain types of writing will offend them, they won’t buy those sorts of books.

Back before the advent of the internet and eBooks, readers didn’t get to rant on public websites and forums about profanity in books, or something that they for whatever personal reason find offensive. Writers are getting antsy, stressed and overly careful of what they write with all the political correctness around these days, but we shouldn’t be. For me personally I’ve read swearwords that turned a mundane sentence into something profound – or hilarious. Books are books, and we generally choose those that we’re fairly confident that we’ll enjoy. Writers aren’t the same as everyone else. They see things differently, with a different kind of clarity and insight I think, and they have the power to use the tools of their trade to convey emotions. That’s what reading’s all about – feeling the emotions turned into words by the author. And when writers do what they have to do and put their words on the page, that’s the end of that, and whether or not people choose to read or approve of those words, at the end of the day the choice of those words belongs only to the author. The words are our choice of the tools we feel are needed to get a reader totally immersed and involved in our tales. Whether they’re politically correct or not – profane or not. Our choice only.

We tell the stories as we want to, and write the words we want to write, but we have no control over how people read our books. I’ve seen a couple of terrible reviews of really good books purely based on small amounts of profanity in them. I’ve used a good few judiciously placed swearwords in most of my books, because they’re what came out as the stories were told. I won’t take them out, and I’m pretty sure that there will be more of them in future books of mine when they’re needed. Obviously we want our books to be read as we wrote them. I’m not suggesting that writers all over the place suddenly start adding profanity to every second sentence – unless they want to. Just that if an F bomb finds its way into a sentence to begin with, the word “darn” or “poot” or whatever is most likely not going to convey the emotion that we want to convey it the first place. Unless you’re ghost writing, only you get to choose the words, and don’t ever let anyone tell you otherwise.

As far as I’m concerned, a word is just a word. How you use it is what can create offense, and scribblers have all it takes to offend when they so choose. A writer has the equipment to turn someone into a soggy puddle if they choose to use their words as swords. There are words, harmless in themselves, that you can stitch together in a sentence that can cause soul cutting offense. And sometimes in a book, that’s exactly what you need to do. As far as I’m concerned the occasional use of a beautifully placed profane bomb is much more harmless than many, many other things in the world today. They’re just words.

There will always be criticism of books for things in them that have offended people, and all people are offended by different things, so this shouldn’t bother us overly much. It goes with the territory. There are readers of every genre under the sun, and they eventually find the authors they love. Nobody loves every book they ever read – if every book was fabulous then trying to stand out from the crowd would be futile anyway. Don’t ever try and change the writer that you are. Write whatever comes out. Whether your natural style is to swear like a trooper or to never use a word stronger than bottom, it’s all allowed, because if you try to change the writer you are, your words will end up stilted and fake. Be exactly who you are. I say cuss all you like if you so choose, and write the way you’re meant to write, and enjoy one of the most powerful gifts of being an Indie writer – the fact that you can. It’s bound to offend someone sooner or later anyway no matter what it is, and spending any of your time worrying about these things is a waste of good writing time.

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Image Credit: Unsplash

7 books to re-think Life by @FTThum

Book n coffee
My favourite things…

 

I question my life. It is what I do – not in a ‘my life sucks’ whiny way, but rather as a search for clarity and meaning, to better understand my words and deeds. And please don’t get me wrong, it is not done in an angst-filled manner either. It is reflective.

I realise I have read many books about living life… some I agreed with, others not so. All have made me pause and re-consider. These books are not ‘how-to’ books but rather books that provoke thoughts, reflection, evaluation…

I have selected 7 books from my bookshelf to share with you, in the order they were read by me to the best of my recollection 🙂 .

An aside, ever wondered why ‘7’ is so popular in Eastern and Western cultures? I have used ‘7’ because it is my favourite number. It is an auspicious number in Chinese culture symbolizing ‘togetherness’ and representing ‘yang’ or masculine energy.

Now, the books:

  1. The Road Less Travelled by M Scott Peck

This is a classic on confronting pain and suffering, and the significance of loving relationships.

  1. Unconditional Life by Deepak Chopra

Consolidating different disciplines from quantum physics to ancient traditions, this is an exposition of the impact of consciousness on our reality and in turn, our health and wellbeing.

  1. The Call by Oriah Mountain Dreamer

An excerpt of the poem, The Call, from the book:

I have heard it all my life,
A voice calling a name I recognized as my own.
 
Sometimes it comes as a soft-bellied whisper.
Sometimes it holds an edge of urgency.
 
But always it says: Wake up my love. You are walking asleep.
There’s no safety in that!

    4.  The Way of the Peaceful Warrior by Dan Millman

What makes you happy? What makes you a true warrior, a champion in life? Whether you agree or not, it’s a different perspective worth considering.

  1. Too Soon Old, Too Late Smart by Dr Gordon Livingstone

A collection of essays written by a psychiatrist, that is akin to ‘life lessons’. Definitely gets you thinking.

  1. Codes of Love by Mark Bryan

A look at the family and how it influences who we are, and how we are able to learn to re-connect with our loved ones, or gain deeper intimacy. Think your family’s normal? 😉

  1. The Good Life by Hugh Mackay

A social commentary on modern life, and in particular the Utopia complex we as a society and as individuals are buying into, by a modern philosopher. What makes a good life? A life worth living?

I hope you find little gems within the pages!

– FlorenceT

@FTThum
MeaningsAndMusings

Florence 2

A @COLLEENCHESEBRO #BOOK #REVIEW “THE MISTREATMENT OF ZORA LANGSTON” by @REBIRTHOFLISA

Mistreatment of Zora Langston

Title:  The Mistreatment of Zora Langston

Author:  Lisa W. Tetting

Website: https://rebirthoflisa.wordpress.com/

ASIN:  B00URD7AKI

ISBN 13: 9780996142908

Published:  1 edition (March 15, 2015)

Pages:  163 pages

Genre:  Young Adult, Drama, Black Fiction, Coming of Age,

*A copy of this book was provided by the author in exchange for an honest review, which follows.

At the tender age of nine years old, Zora Langston loses the most important person in her life, her father.  This one event, sets off a chain of events that is mind-boggling.  Zora is left with a mother who despises her, a sister who hates her, and a brother who does not even acknowledge her presence.  The death of Zora’s father is further exacerbated when her mother’s boyfriend moves in and takes his place as the head of the household.

Zora struggles to cope with the harsh treatment she receives, as the youngest child in the family.  Naïve as she is, Zora is forced to cope with adult situations that propel her into a new path in her life.  Through all of this, Zora remembers the love and the many lessons from her father, while relying on her faith to help her survive.

Eventually Zora finds the love and understanding she deserves from her Aunt and Uncle, who embrace her into their family.  Haunted by her past, Zora is forced to face old abusers, and new abusers.  Nevertheless, life goes on, and through love and trust Zora is lead to the truth of what it means to be part of a family.

Zora Langston tells this story with all the wisdom a nine-year-old girl can share.  The reader lives through her, and experiences what the child goes through on a daily basis.  I was visually shaken after the confrontation with her mother’s boyfriend.  Zora handles her circumstances with the grace and dignity of a true survivor.  I was drawn into Zora’s world.  I felt her pain and neglect, and her joy and sorrow.  All I wanted to do, was grab this child, hug her, and never let her go!

Lisa Tetting

Author, Lisa Tetting

There is sexual abuse and violence portrayed in the book.  However, it is my opinion that the author portrays this abuse realistically through the words of young Zora.  This is Lisa Tetting’s debut novel, and I believe she achieves her goal of showing how prevalent this type of abuse is in our society.

I was moved beyond words at the treatment Zora endured.  However, I found Zora’s courage and motivation to move forward and heal from her wounds, the most important message in the story.  If you love family drama, young adult literature, and stories that give you hope about life, look no further.  Zora Langston will fill your heart.

RATINGS
Realistic Characterization: 5/5
Made Me Think: 5/5
Overall enjoyment: 5/5
Readability: 4/5
Recommended: 4/5
Overall Rating: 4.5

Buy it at: Amazon
Format & Pricing:
Create Space – Paperback: $10.95 US
Kindle: $3.99 US

Goodreads

 

 Colleen_Silver_Threading

 

 

 

 

@ColleenChesebro

www.SilverThreading.com

How I learned to Kill My Darlings.

You’ve heard the expression in writing that you may come to a point where you must “kill your darlings.” Some will even say kill every last one of the son of a—oops. I was channeling someone else for a moment. Some darlings are okay to keep, but some should be killed. But how to know which and who came up with the idea of the da—yeah, channeling again.

There once was a man named Q, who didn’t know what to do, then one day, decided to say, all your darlings do slay.

In 1912 Arthur Quiller-Couch became a professor at Cambridge. In his first series of lectures he coined a phrase, or at least it is our earliest noted use of said phrase and in the portion of that lecture it went like this:

Arthur Quiller-Couch“[If] you here require a practical rule of me, I will present you with this: ‘Whenever you feel an impulse to perpetrate a piece of exceptionally fine writing, obey it—whole-heartedly—and delete it before sending your manuscript to press. Murder your darlings.”~Arthur Quiller-Couch from On the Art of Writing Lectures delivered in the University of Cambridge 1913-1914.-Page 146

 

If this be much too much for some to grasp and too ancient I shall refer you to a more god like being in the eyes of us mere mortallaic scribes.Stephen King

“Kill your darlings, kill your darlings, even when it breaks your egocentric little scribbler’s heart, kill your darlings.” ~Stephen King from his On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft.

Perhaps even that is a little too old school for some. How about this?

Neil Gaiman“I absolutely believe in taking out things that make the story better if they aren’t there. Just as I believe in writing scenes you didn’t want to write, when you’re doing the second draft, because it makes the story work better if they are there.

Other than that, I think you’re God when you write, and you get to make the universe the way you want it. If you’ve written something really good, why would you get rid of it? Normally the bits that I really like are the bits that my readers really like too.”~Neil Gaiman , his Tumblr,com page March 18, 2012 (This link will open in this page.)

kill the darlingsIf you are still with me then you are wondering what my advice is on how to kill your darlings. What one piece of advice can I give that you may not have heard before?

Write and draft and draft until you loath, you despise, you literally wish to KILL your novel. The darlings will then leap from the page and sacrifice themselves. Until this point your darlings are in disguise.

I speak from experience. Recently I’ve been working on draft after draft of a book I began back in 2012 or earlier. 300 pages of words, non-stop for days on end have been my life. I know all of you reading can feel me on this one. I am now in stage 25 of writer draft coma and am hooked up to an IV of coffee—I only started drinking coffee a few weeks ago. I think there may be a correlation, and yes that’s how bad it’s been. No, not the story, but how dedicated I am to getting this one exactly how I want it.

In stage 25 it happened. I. Killed. A. Darling. Then. Another. I began to read and see the saccharine everywhere. Those cheesy bits of one-liners in the interior monologue of the narrator that is supposed to be cool because he represents ME! I had reached hatred level. The more I read, the more it became obvious that I, the narrator would NOT say these things. No one in their right mind would read these words and say, “Oh yes, I’ve thought those very same things myself.”

Some of you are saying at this time, “I will never loath my novel.” By loathing your novel I am in effect stating you are loathing the process of continuously laboring over the need to draft and draft. Your mind will eventually have mercy on you.

But how can you do this? I realized somethings.

One is as I said before there are things people just don’t say. They draw attention to the writing. They pull me out of the story, even my own story.

Then I determined things I had in the story were things people skipped. You know those passages in a book you will likely skip as you go along. You get to certain parts and you want to know this, not that. “That” is a darling. “This” is what you need. I found a way to get out of the way of the story. I want my stories read. Is my story the same story without “That”? If the answer is yes, then son long to “That”. Yes, I know I am using quotation marks too often but I am doing it for emphasis.

Going through my novel again I have made great cuts and slashes. Phrasing is improving left and right, pace has improved, the voices of the characters are becoming more distinct. It has taken a long time to get to this point and a lot of pain, in the literal sense. I would not change a moment of it. What I discovered is something that will help me for the remainder of my writing career.

Will this be the piece of advice that helps you get to that goal you have? I don’t know, but every tip is worth at least reading about. I’ve found I gain something each time, or I lose brain cells from the sheer duh duh duh of the person who thought they should be giving advice. Yes, go ahead and say it as you finish reading this about me. All together now. DUH DUH DUH.

But one last bit of advice. Make certain to save that previous draft. When it comes time for your Beta-Readers to read, you may find you need to Frankenstein some Darlings.

@RonovanWrites

 

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#Book #Review @OlgaNM7 ‘Normal’ by Graeme Cameron. A romantic twist on the serial killer novel. And British

Normal by Graeme Cameron
Normal by Graeme Cameron

Title:   Normal
Author:   Graeme Cameron
ASIN:  B00OY2769S
Published:  Kindle version due on 6th April. Hardback  available from 31st March and paperback due in September 29th )
Pages:  301 pages
Genre:  Thriller (serial killer)/romance

Thanks to Net Galley and to Harlequin Mira for providing me with a free copy of this novel in exchange for an honest review.

Normal takes another look at the ever popular figure of the serial killer. This one is not only British, but also fairly “normal”. The author choses to use first person narration as a way of keeping the main character anonymous (no description, no personal details other than his own narration of his actions and his environment, not even a name) and of offering the readers and insight into the mind of the murderer. And this was where the problem resided for me. Of course a serial killer deserving of that name would have to appear “normal” to society at large, otherwise he would be easily spotted and stopped. But there are certain psychological characteristics that would be expected, like superficial charm, callousness, lack of empathy… All of these are present to a certain level, and even give rise to pretty humorous (in a dark humour kind of way) situations, but unravel when he seems to fall in love and becomes… an utter disaster.

From being a man who had managed to kill an undetermined number of young women, never getting caught and who had a pretty organised system, he becomes one who starts making mistakes, forgetting to bury bodies, and getting himself caught in all kinds of dangerous situations. At some point, cruelty and all, the novel becomes somewhat slapstick in its situations, and it seems that if he doesn’t get caught sooner is only down to his good luck and to the utter lack of skills of the local police (who pay dearly for their mistakes).

I wasn’t sure if the lack of psychological consistency in the character was meant to indicate a crisis (of conscience, a moral crisis) or to point out at the redeeming powers of love. The characters comments towards the end (that I won’t reveal, although the actual end is not completely closed) indicate the second option, and that stretches somewhat the limits of credibility, but maybe I’m just too cynical. As the book is a Harlequin Edition, this makes some sense, and it’s an interesting move within their line of publications.

Some reviewers have queried the lack of explanation of the motivations for the character’s actions that are only vaguely hinted at. Although that is true, the main character never seems to entertain deep reflections about himself other than in relation to his immediate plans, actions and the likely consequences of these and there doesn’t seem to be much space for biographical reflection in the way his brain works.

The character that I found intriguing is Erica who is totally unexplained and unexplainable, and in some ways I wonder how the novel would have been if she was the narrator of the story (or this had been a third person narration to allows us some insight into her).

This is a good read (if you tolerate violence, although is by far not as violent as other books on the subject), the language flows easily, and it has enough intrigue, and dark humoured moments to keep most readers of the genre happy. Being a psychiatrist (and a forensic psychiatrist at that) I wasn’t totally convinced by the psychological portrayal of the character and his behaviour in the last third of the book but I don’t think I’m the intended reader of this novel. In my opinion most readers of thrillers looking for something a bit different will enjoy it, but maybe not the hard core of the genre.

Ratings:
Realistic Characterization: 3/5
Made Me Think: 4/5
Overall enjoyment: 3.5/5
Readability: 4.5/5
Recommended: 4/5
Overall Rating: 3.5/5
 

Buy it at: Amazon
Format & Pricing:
Paperback$ 13.04 (Available from 29th September)
Hardback:  $ 18.71 (Available from 31st March)
Kindle: $7.25 (Available from 6th April. Currently on pre-order)

Thank you all for reading, and  you know what I say, like, share, comment, and if you’re really interested, get pre-CLICKING!

Olga Núñez Miret

Olga_Núñez_Miret_author.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

@OlgaNM7

http://OlgaNM.wordpress.com

http://www.OlgaNM.com

Masters of Time: A Sci-fi & Fantasy Time Travel Anthology Cover Reveal

Hone the untapped powers of your mind to rewind time and save the love of your life.

Step through a painting and explore an eerie past.

Jump into the future with a clone who will usurp his destiny…

July 2015, Time will fall into unlikely hands

Masters of Time: A Sci-fi & Fantasy Time Travel Anthology will be released July 13, 2015. These high-impact short stories are brought to you by USA Today bestselling author Samantha LaFantasie, Amazon bestselling authors Devorah Fox and Alesha Escobar, and the exceptionally talented authors Timothy C. Ward, H.M. Jones, and Alice Marks.

Enter the Giveaway: http://ow.ly/IUVJ7
Meet the Authors: http://bit.ly/18qI4qs
Follow us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/mastersanthology

Masters of Time Kindle Cover-1

What’s in a Name? Amazon Author Pages and Nom de Plumes

Authors use nom de plumes for various reasons. Erotica writers for instance, who don’t want their families to find out how they’re earning their crusts. Fictionalised memoirs are also books that sometimes could cause major problems for their authors if the people in their lives that are also in their memoirs find out. Especially if they are painted in an unfavourable light. This can lead to legal action, apart from any other sort of revenge the “injured” party might think to take. Hugely successful authors, like Stephen King who wrote as Richard Bachman, have dipped their toes into these waters for various reasons. Sometimes to see if they would be as successful if readers didn’t know their books had been written by them (I knew with King and Bachman though – before the truth was told), and sometimes simply because they don’t want to anger readers of a certain genre they write in by publishing a totally different genre, thereby possibly incurring accidental purchases of genres that are not enjoyed.

If you write horror, romance, and also children’s books, you can publish them all under your own name, and have them all listed on your Amazon Central Author Page, comfortable that the very different covers and blurbs are sufficient for readers to be aware of the genres. Or you can use three nom de plumes, and still list them all on your one Author Page, preferring that all your writings are kept in the same place. Possibly horror and children’s books don’t belong on the same page though.

Amazon allows you to have three separate Author Pages using nom de plumes on your one Kindle account. Only you will ever know that the books listed on them are yours, unless you choose to market them using your own name and marketing avenues. This means that you still have your current fan base to share the books you publish under your new nom de plume, and you can even add your real name either on the cover or somewhere in the front matter of all your books, as well as list them all on your website. The choice is yours though. Sometimes totally incognito is the way to go, while still being able to sell your wares, in which case open websites, Twitter accounts and so on using your nom de plume. Here’s how you do it.

1. Publish your book as usual, using only your nom de plume as the author, then find it and claim it as yours.

2. When the box opens for you to stake your claim, you’ll see the following:

You are not listed as the author of this book.
Do you see your name below?
Do you have a pen name?
If you write under a different name, let us know.

3. Click on let us know in the final option.

4. When you get a confirmation email from Amazon, simply click to confirm that you are the actual author of the book, and Bob’s your uncle!

You can then easily toggle between your newly linked Author Pages on Author Central from a drop down menu right beside your name, where it helpfully says, Click here to switch pen names. Then zoom off to assume your third alter ego, close the curtains, lock the doors, and write anything at all that takes your fancy. Your privacy is assured.

If you have more than three alter egos, then you need to open a second Author Central account with a different email address, but I’m pretty sure that three should do you very nicely.

Don’t forget to do the same on all the Amazon sites that you sell your books from. Happy flying under the radar scribblers.

 

2014-07-07 10.38.05

The Legacy of Fear Q&A with Vanessa A. Ryan @vryan333

RW: I’m reading The Legacy of Fear now and enjoying it. The entire idea is right up my alley. How do you come up with the titles of your books?

VANESSA: Sometimes the title just comes to me. Other times, I ask my family, friends, the publisher, or even strangers I might see on the street to help me choose the best wording of a preliminary title. They’ll all haHorrorAtTheLakebooksve different opinions, and then the hard part is making the final decision.

RW: I am getting the whole the feel of, well, spooky, are you a sunshine weather writer or rainy day type?

VANESSA: I like overcast days. In fact, I love overcast weather. I feel more creative when the sky is gray and the atmosphere is a little foggy. Sunny days are just for enjoying the warmth of the sun, smiling a lot and not thinking much.

RW: Tell us about how writing regime, if you have one that is?

VANESSA: My writing schedule is to write at least a thousand words a day, seven days a week, for the first draft. Most of that happens late at night, when the phone is least likely to ring. I may stay up until two in the morning to get in those thousand words, especially when I’ve had a busy day doing something else. I know if I don’t persevere, I won’t get that first draft written. As for revisions and rewrites, I like those the best. The hard work is already done. Cutting, revising and adding is the fun part.

RW: Do you jump out of bed with coffee in hand or are you an afternoon writer?

I never jump out of bed for anything, unless the house is on fire––which has happened to me. I like coffee and breakfast in the morning, and reading the Los Angeles Times. Three days a week I read it online, and four days a week I get it delivered. It’s an important part of my daily routine. I never turn on the TV or radio for the news in the morning. I’m the type who wakes up slowly. I like to know what’s going on in the world, but without someone barking at me. If I can, I will write in the afternoon for a while. I might finish what I started writing in the afternoon later that night, if I didn’t get enough done.

RW: What do you have to avoid when writing a book?

VANESSA: I have to avoid too many other activities, or cut the time I devote to them. And since I’ve always got ideas in my head for new stories, I have to stop thinking of them so I can write the book I’ve already started.

RW: Do you ever get burned out?

VANESSA: Sure. Writing is work. It’s putting in the time. Since December, I have been taking a break. But the holidays are over, and tomorrow, I will begin looking at the edits of the last book in my trilogy, Horror At The Lake, A Vampire Tale. However, even when I’m not writing, I’m thinking of my next book or series of books.

RW: How do you start to write a book? What is the first step?V.Ryan

VANESSA: The first step is to decide which book floating around in my head I am going to commit to writing down. I usually know who the main character is and whether I’m going to write in the first person or in the third, but I will have to rough out the secondary characters. The next most important thing is to figure out the ending. The challenge then, is how to get from the beginning to the end. Sometimes I write plot points on three by five cards, and sometimes I just wing it and start writing. I try to write chapters that are about ten pages long, and I read over what I wrote yesterday, before I begin writing again.

RW: What books have most influenced your life most?

VANESSA: I think the books of Carlos Castaneda, Curt Vonnegut, Jerzy Kosinsky, and the mystery writers of the twentieth century, such Agatha Christie and Ross MacDonald. Also the noir writers, such as Cornell Woolrich, Charles Willeford and Dorothy B. Hughes. But one of the most important influences in my life was meeting Ray Bradbury after a lecture he gave. I had read Death Is A Lonely Business, and although not one of his most famous books, it is set in Venice, CA, where I once lived. It inspired me to write my paranormal novel A Blue Moon, which also takes place in Venice, CA. It was thrilling to meet the writer who inspired me to write the book.

RW: Recently one of our Team here on LWI wrote an article about being a writer versus being an author. Do you see writing as a career?

VANESSA: I do see writing as a career. Of course, every writer hopes to have a best seller, but regardless, I will keep at it as long as I have stories I feel impelled to write.

RW: Do you recall how your interest in writing first came to life?

VANESSA: I started writing in the third grade. My teacher allotted a portion of her lessons to creative writing every week. In the sixth grade, we put on a school play and I wrote the script.

RW: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

VANESSA: No. I’ll just write another book.

RW: What are you working on now?

palette-for-murderVANESSA: I am currently working on another traditional mystery, the second in the Lana Davis series, titled A Date For Murder. The first, A Palette For Murder, will be released this May by Five Star Publishing.

RW: How do you de-stress from those moments of word overload or word weary?

VANESSA: I don’t know that I get tired of looking at words, but I do need to take time off. I love walking in a park near my house, watching my favorite TV shows, traveling and socializing with friends.

RW: Book covers are more important than people think. I mean an author knows but I like how yours in a series almost brand the series. What’s the book cover process for you?

VANESSA: The publishers of my books have designers and they create covers from settings in the books that I describe to them.

RW: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

VANESSA: That first draft is always the hardest part.

RW: I agree with you there. Although my gazillionth draft seems to be hard too. Now what did you learn during the writing of The Legacy of Fear and really any book you write?

VANESSA: I have learned to be more forgiving. All my characters have flaws, some worse than others, but they have some redeeming or humanizing characteristics as well.

RW: What is one piece of advice you would give another writer?

VANESSA: Talk less and listen more. I get many of my ideas for stories from what people say.

RW: And now, what last thought for our friends today?

VANESSA: I hope you enjoy my books and the journeys they take you on.

 

Vanessa A. Ryan is the author of:

Horror At The Lake, A Vampire Tale (mystery trilogy):

Book 1, The Legacy Of Fear: http://vanessaaryan.com/TheLegacyOfFear.html#buy

Book 2, The Trail Of Terrorhttp://vanessaaryan.com/TheTrailofTerror.html#buy

Book 3, The Blood Of Redemptioncoming in April
A Palette For Murder pre-order now: http://vanessaaryan.com/APaletteForMurder.html#buycoming in April

 

Follow Vanessa A. Ryan at:
https://twitter.com/vryan333
http://vanessaryanwriter.blogspot.com
https://www.facebook.com/VanessaRyan33

http://www.amazon.com/author/vryan
http://www.imdb.com/name/nm2543030

 There you have readers. By the way, you’ve seen Vanessa before. You may not realize it but I know many of you have. Snoop around and you’ll discover from where. By her books. I’m enjoying The Legacy of Fear now.~@RonovanWrites

 

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March 18th at 8 pm ET/5 pm PT to talk #audiobook #marketing #TalkingACX Twitter Chat @K8Tilton @ACX_com

Authors have a lot to juggle, from writing to publishing and everything in between. So how do you find the time to market your audiobooks?k8combined

ACX is teaming up with author assistant Kate Tilton this Wednesday, March 18th at 8 pm ET/5 pm PT to talk audiobook marketing and other ways an assistant can help your career. Join us for a #TalkingACX Twitter Chat to get tips and advice for fitting marketing into your busy schedule.

How can you participate? It’s easy!

  1. Follow @ACX_com and @K8Tilton on Twitter.
  2. Join us on Wednesday, March 18th just before 8 pm ET/5 pm PT on Twitter, or follow along on Twubs.
  3. Bring your questions and comments, and tweet them at us using the hashtag #TalkingACX.

We look forward to chatting with you on Wednesday!

The ACX Team

 

Remember to Reblog, Tweet, share this however you can. Free, good advice is hard to find.

 

5 Psychological Blocks that Stop Bloggers (and Writers) Going from Good to Great @OlgaNM7

Hi all:

I was checking through some blogs and found one that I felt spoke to me and I thought I’d share it with you to see if it resonates with you too. The original post was in Problogger and it’s a guest contribution by a psychologist, Dr Alice Boyes. You can read it here. Although the title of the post is: 5 Psychological Blocks that Stop Bloggers Going from Good to Great, I felt those apply to writers in general, and of course, many of us are also bloggers.

X ray photographs of person s skull uid 1171297

To summarise, Dr Boyes mentions five blocks to developing a blogger’s (read writer’s) career:

  1. Imposter Syndrome. You aren’t good enough, you aren’t really a writer, how can you compare with others, who are you trying to fool…This blocks you as you don’t feel you should reach to others whom you view as true… (bloggers, writers, authors…), or you don’t challenge yourself and put yourself to the test. Her suggestions of solutions include looking at the evidence, realising that this is just a thought (a negative thought indeed), asking yourself what would you be doing if you were the real deal and doing that, and understanding and giving yourself self-compassion. On the note of self-compassion, one of the things I used to tell my patients who came up with very negative comments about themselves was: what would you tell a friend, or somebody you knew, who came and told you what you’re telling me? Would you really think they were no good at what they were doing or not as professional…or whatever the issue was? Sometimes we are so much harder on ourselves than we are on others.
  2. Avoidance Coping. When you’re avoiding doing the things that should be your first priority by doing other less important things. I think we can all relate to this. I’m not pointing any fingers other than at myself. She suggests as solutions having a very simple to do list, putting limits on other tasks and being mindful of them (she suggest an App you can check although I’ve seen many advertised), and keeping a balance (80/20 anybody?).
  3. All-or-nothing Thinking. Everything should be done and done to perfection. Therefore as that is impossible, we give up completely on what could be a good idea. Although she doesn’t call it that, I think her suggestion for dealing with this would be ‘embrace the middle ground’ or ‘compromise’. If a task seems overwhelming, try and compromise on something workable you can do or break it in little chunks and do them at your own pace. Remember: Rome wasn’t built in one day.
  4. Running your Willpower Back to Empty. In talking about blogging Dr Boyes suggests that due to the many things one could do to ensure success at blogging, people might end up running round in circles, exhausting themselves and forgetting to take into consideration the big picture (the reason why we started doing something in the first place). And also losing sight of the goal (the doing becomes the end in itself). That’s also the case in writing and promoting/marketing. The amount of information, suggestions and new ideas are mindboggling. You can end up feeling like a hamster running on the wheel. She suggests shorter (microbreaks) and longer breaks, including disconnecting completely from the computer and going away, as that will give you a new perspective (the same most writers recommend doing once you finish your manuscript).
  5. Unwillingness to Tolerate Knockbacks. It doesn’t matter how well you do something, there will be people who don’t like it, or who think that it could/should be done differently. Dr Boyes says it’s important to build a level of tolerance (not insensitivity) to it, particularly if you’re prone to ruminating and overthinking what you could have done wrong. (She here recommends her book, but as I haven’t read it I won’t, although if the post is an example of what she offers, it might be worth a look). There’s much written about negative reviews and I think most of us know that however objective or neutral they might be (and not all are) they tend to feel personal because our books are our creations. As possible solutions she suggests: Expecting a 50% success rate rather than 100% (I guess we could call it redefining success). Also accepting your sensitivity rather than fighting against it and she recommends quick mindfulness meditations to help the negative thoughts pass quickly (with links). I have been meditating for over a year now, and although I’m sure it’s not for everybody (and I was’t very convinced it was for me) I’d say it has helped me. lontree (1)

Thanks so much to Pro Blogger and Dr Bloye for her article and inspiration, thanks to you all for reading, and let me know if you think those apply to writing too. And any tricks to deal with these or other blocks are welcome!

Tallos-Episode One (Season One) Interview with Granser Kelly.

RW: Tallos-Episode One (Season One) has some details very much set in the South here in the United States, is that from personal experience having lived in the area, why that area specifically, or will that give too much away of the future episodes?

GRANSER: I spent quite a bit of time there, actually. I wanted to begin the series in a familiar setting so to give it a sense of authenticity. The story as a whole will span the entire country and possibly other parts of the world. But I felt the southern states would be a good place for me to begin.

RW: What genre would you categorize Tallos?

GRANSER: I consider it Post-Apocalyptic Science Fiction. It’s also categorized in Action/Adventure, but that’s way too broad and vague, in my opinion.

RW: Where did the idea come from?

GRANSER: I was approached through a friend a while back to be part of a collaborative effort based on preset story guidelines. The rules for the world were already in place and all I had to do was come up with the particulars for my installment. It actually reminded me of writing fan fiction (not something I do).

Unfortunately, about the time I had the plot more or less mapped out, I had to withdraw due to other obligations. Later, once life calmed down a bit, I decided to revisit the story. I never did like the original world in which it was set, so I made some adjustments and brainstormed for a week or so. Once I had the basic concept in my head, the rest was easy.            

RW: For a post-apocalyptic story I think this is something that gives a different feel. Not that it’s my particular genre, but I am familiar enough with it to know what’s what. Did you set out to intentionally be different or did the story sort of lead itself in that direction? Were you the director or the guy typing what they characters told you to say?

GRANSER: It wasn’t intentional. Like you, I’m not what one would consider an expert in the Post-Apocalyptic genre. In fact, this is my first go at it. I think that in itself may lend to a more original feel, being that I’m not following any pre-prescribed guidelines.

Regarding my approach – I’m both. I try to be the character at times, but that’s not always practical, or even preferable, when you need to move a story along. You want to develop your cast of characters in a way that is believable, but you can’t allow it to bog you down and slow the progression of the plot.  

RW: Tell us about Jim Tallos? Who is he?

GRANSER: He’s an interesting mix of a selfish asshole and a brave hero. I didn’t want a “super soldier” protagonist with high morals and flawless character who can get out of any situation due to his Rambo-like kickassyness (yes, that’s a word) and MacGyver-like intelligence. But I needed him to be likeable too. I decided to use other characters to help me build his personality and develop him from situation to situation.

I can’t really say who he is exactly, as that is a major plot point.

RW: You somewhat touch on some social issues of today and how they are in the after-math. Again, was that something intentional?

GRANSER: Yes. Absolutely intentional. I loathe bigotry. Whether it’s homophobia, sexism, racism, or any other ism. I don’t intend to beat people over the head with my politics, but I do want to include that particular point in this story. I think that’s evident from the onset.

RW: Are there plans for, how can I put this, spinoffs? You’ve set it up in the first Episode where there could be other storylines pay out.

GRANSER: I haven’t thought about it. When I started Tallos, I decided to model it after a television series format. This is why I’ve divided it into seasons and episodes. Each episode leads into the next, but I try to leave out the cliffhanger aspect one might find in full-length novels. It also allows for episodes which focus on the characters rather than the plot. In other words, I can have a cool idea for an episode which doesn’t necessarily move the plot along very far, yet still fits into the story.  

RW: Reading the book I can tell what Tallos likes to drink to relax but what does Granser Kelly like to drink when facing demons?

GRANSER: Love me some Jack Daniel. Oh, yes I do. My wife hates it – the Jack, not me drinking it – so I rarely run out.

RW: What do you say to people who read books like this with some of the scenes you write and say “Are you completely freakin’ messed up in the head to think of this stuff?”

GRANSER: I’d say they’re right. But who isn’t? The difference is that I’ve learned to express my psychosis in words and use it to tell stories.

RW: One thing I like about the story you’ve created is we have no idea what the problem is. Do you know the end of it all or are you along for the ride as much as we are for the moment?

GRANSER: I know the story to the end – a least to an extent. That is to say I know the main plot points – the major twists and so forth. But I allow for new ideas to take things in different directions. It’s actually one of the advantages to the format I’ve adopted.

RW: What authors influenced you in this particular area of storytelling? I guess it would be horror and some psychological influences.

GRANSER: None really. Post-Apocalyptic Fiction wasn’t a genre in which I had much interest until recently. I’ve always enjoyed Science Fiction, however. Asimov was a favorite as a teen – though his approach is far more optimistic than mine. I also love Frank Herbert, Orson Scott Card, Ray Bradbury, and on the more whimsical side Douglas Adams. This is naturally only a few names on a long list of great writers.TallosGKS1E1

RW: How many seasons can we expect from Tallos?

GRANSER: I’m thinking three for now. But that may change should the need arise. I wouldn’t want to end the story prematurely. And as the story will become increasingly complex as time passes, I’ll need to allow enough space to tie up loose ends without it seeming rushed.

RW: Are any of the people in the story based on any of your friends and if so do they know it?

GRANSER: Not specifically, no. Though like any writer, I draw from my own experience. My characters are a combination of personalities I’ve encountered over the years. Occasionally, I will write someone I know in. But it’s almost always an insularly character with little bearing on the over-all plot.

RW: What scares Granser Kelly?

GRANSER: Lots of things. I’m more or less a walking heap of character flaws, psychiatric neuroses, and phobias. I fear success, failure, clowns, baby pigeons, alligators, purple socks, aluminum foil, bats, things that aren’t bats, crowds, isolation, public speaking, public nudity, private nudity, sex (both the act and not getting enough), change, stagnation, and people taller than six feet. That’s the short list.

RW: How good are you with a gun and if you are good what is your choice?

GRANSER: I love to shoot rifles, handguns…whatever. Sadly, there is nothing safer than what I’m trying to hit.

RW: Tell me you write these things in broad daylight, because if I wrote some of these scenes at night I would have some serious issues sleeping? Not that they were gory or anything. In fact they were much more psychological in nature to me.

GRANSER: I don’t mind it. I had night terrors as a child, so I learned to pull myself back into a semi-conscious state when it gets too bad. Besides, my various phobias don’t differentiate between day and night.

RW: What does your wife think of the mind that produces something like this and does it concern her at times?

GRANSER: Let me explain something about crazy. A person’s crazy is like water inside a big barrel. When they meet, some people choose to just kick it over and spill their crazy all over everything – including the other person. The advantage to this is that there are few surprises down the road. You know what you’re getting into. Of course, if your barrel of crazy is too big you can wash the other person away and be left there alone with nothing but you and your crazy.

The other option is to take a ladle, dip it in the barrel, and show the other person your crazy a little at a time. The upshot is that you might not scare the hell out of a potential mate, and possibly have a miniscule chance of getting them to have sex with you. If you’re lucky, they might mistake your crazy for quirkiness and depth. This turns some people on – especially if they think you’re an artist of some sort. The downside is that should you take it to the next level, that person begins to realize just how much crazy has yet to be discovered. Hopefully by then you would have tricked them into loving you, and forced them to overlook the big barrel of crazy that seems to have no bottom. That’s me and my wife.

 

And there you have, folks. As far as I know, the very first interview with Granser Kelly. I do encourage you to read the book. I enjoyed the story and the idea a lot. You get a familiar feel about it but originality as well. Comfort with creativity combined. Can’t complain about that, right?

Click http://amzn.to/1B8GGPZ and get it now. Read my Review there and click the it was helpful button for me. That is, if it was helpful.

 

Much Respect,

Ronovan

Ron_LWI

 

 

 

 

 

@RonovanWrites

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#BookLaunch #Author Christy Sloat with Slumber TODAY! $.99

What happens when a princess murders her prince? This princess doesn’t get tiaras and ballgowns; she gets her own room at Spindle Ridge Asylum.

Christy Sloat has wowed us before with her YA Paranormal Romance, let her do it again with her first Fantasy Duology for teens. Slumber (book one) is a fractured fairy tale that will amaze you until the very last page.

Slumber book cover

Find out more about this book below:

 

Not all princesses get their happily ever after…

They tell me I killed my boyfriend Phillip in cold blood. I stabbed him twenty one times. I’m only seventeen years old, and I am serving life in Spindle Ridge Asylum for the Criminally Insane.

I don’t remember killing him, so it’s really hard to believe I’m capable of murder. In fact I don’t remember anything before I came to Spindle Ridge, not even my boyfriend.

I can only grasp onto my realistic dreams while the madness of the asylum threatens to pull me under.  I dream I’m a beautiful princess and there is an evil faerie named Maleficent who is bent on my destruction. The dreams are the closest thing I have to memories of my life, except they aren’t real.

I’m crazy. I’m not a princess.

They’re the mad illusions of an irrational teenage girl, right?

They’ve assigned me a new doctor, and she says I can trust her, and that she’ll help me see the truth of who I really am.

When she arrived she brought a new patient, Sawyer, who is everything Spindle Ridge isn’t: exciting, mysterious and beautiful. He promises he’s here to rescue me. Trusting either of them frightens me.

Could it be possible that my dreams are more than just the imaginings of a delusional girl? Could they be truth?

 

 

GET THE EBOOK FOR ONLY .99 FOR A LIMITED TIME! 

Amazon US- http://amzn.to/1GwpYi5
Amazon UK- http://amzn.to/1C9ns1W
Amazon CA- http://amzn.to/1HLuw5m
Smashwords- http://bit.ly/1Cauntm
iTunes-http://apple.co/1DaUGQ3

christy sloat

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Christy Sloat can be stalked by clicking the links below

Website
Instagram
Facebook

 

Christy’s having a release party on her Facebook page for the release. March 16th 

She’d love for you to attend

Slumber Launch Event

 

Authors, Wake Up and Get to Work!

wake-up

Before you authors run away because I’m talking about a marketing idea today. Don’t. You blew that one off with another author’s post recently and missed out on a very good, very easy opportunity. We write about things like book covers and formatting and you eat it up but anything that ventures in to the area of the dreaded world of promotion you run like conservative and a tree hugger festival.

I have eleven years experience in marketing. My interest in helping promote authors is not one that is some half wit idea without some thought given. I’ve done articles about authors needing social media presence for a reason. Articles about getting your book description right on Amazon have come up, with little attention by readers.

“Why does my great book about blah blah blah not sell?” Because your book description says a boy and his dog set off on an adventure across the country. That it, nothing else.

Back to marketing. How do you get people to buy your books? Advertising? No.

There are two ways; Word of Mouth and Word of Your Mouth

Word of Mouth

This is how most books get around. People to friends. Those friends could be face to face friends (f-f) or online community friends (OCF). Regardless of which, they are among people that know each other and are liable to listen. Send me an Amazon email with that list of books and I am more than likely not going to bother.

Word of Your Mouth

And here is why I’m writing this today. Jo Robinson wrote a great article How to Create Downloadable Links to Give Away Books from your Newsletter Sign Up  In it she discusses exactly what the title says. But there is something she mentions that might be missed. And it was missed by a lot of people because for some reason this article didn’t get the massive response a Jo Robinson article normally does. Why? I won’t repeat why but as authors we want to write our books and that’s it.

Those times are long gone unless you write about wizards and have a nice bit of plastic surgery done. Or you have so many books out there that they do your leg work for you. But even then you have to play the game. Indie Authors MUST do it. House Published authors NEED to do it and are encouraged to do it by their publishing house.

What did Jo say in her article? A lot. But the one piece that I am talking about is as an author you MUST build up an email list. An email list is made up of people who have shown interest in something you were giving enough to give you their email address, which is a big deal these days. Start now before you even know you are going to write a book. Come up with some idea for a Newsletter and have those people sign up. 1000 people sign up and then get word of your book. Let’s say 10% buy your book. 100 people buy it. of that say 50% tell their f-f or OCF.

It keeps going and going. Your one email newsletter or email blast about your book is now spreading for you by word of mouth. Just think. Oprah speaks and people buy. Books never heard of may be mentioned by her and are then a best seller in days.

Read Jo’s article about how to set up a newsletter email system. It’s worth the time.

Ron_LWI

 

 

 

 

@RonovanWrites
on GoodReads
on Google+
on Facebook

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HOW TO BOOST AUTHOR PROFILES on FACEBOOK in TWO EASY STEPS

Our Simian Friend has some great advice. Check it out y’all.

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

It’s easy.

Pick ONE author each day.

1.  LIKE their Facebook Page or FRIEND them.

2.  INVITE YOUR  friends to also LIKE or FRIEND the authors Facebook Page.

Now THAT’s easy isn’t it?

NOTE: DO NOT SPAM YOUR FRIENDS

One invite per friend per day is enough!

facebook_logo

View original post

#Book #Review by @RonovanWrites Tallos-Episode One by Granser Kelly Mad Max meets The Walking Dead.

tallos-season-one-granser-kelly

Title: Tallos-Episode One (Season One)
Author: Granser Kelly
Price: .99
File Size: 2214 KB
Print Length: 66 pages
Publisher: Longfire Press (March 9, 2015)
Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
Language: English
Text-to-Speech: Enabled
X-Ray: Not Enabled
Word Wise: Not Enabled
Lending: Enabled
Available: Kindle here

Author Granser Kelly brings us what I like to call Mad Max with sanity meets The Walking Dead.

In Tallos-Season One-Episode One, former US Army soldier Jim Tallos is the protector of a small group of survivors about the float, a construct of a floating platform and sailboats. It’s the only way for them to stay safe from the cannibals and the Shadow People that now inhabit the southern US during this post apocalyptic world.

Tallos’ main goals are to survive and find his family. The problem is where to start and how to start. Straying too far from the float almost assures death or capture. Jim finds himself in a situation where he must leave and in so doing discovers information that changes everything he knows of the current state of things and his future.

The story has a good flow and keeps you wanting to know what happens next. You wonder who is who and what who is. Even when you think one thing you are very likely wrong. Even now as I write this I wonder about things. What more do you want from a book where there is a guaranteed next episode a month away? You want to know what happens next, right? Well, you have it in Tallos-Season One-Episode One by Granser Kelly.

Character Believability: 4.5granser kelly
Flow and Pace: 4
Reader Engagement: 4
Reader Enrichment: 4
Reader Enjoyment: 4.5
Overall Rate: 4.2

Get on Kindle Today. Click here to go to Amazon! Check out my Book Review there as well and click if it was helpful.

Ron_LWI

 

 

 

 

@RonovanWrites

at GoodReads

on Facebook

on Google+

 

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#Indie #Author @HHBasquiat needs #Help

book_image

An Indie Author Help Alert!

Helena Hann-Basquiat

Has a pubslush fund going and needs some help with it.

And YOU DO GET SOMETHING for your help.

Click and find out what you get at what level.

https://pubslush.com/project/4519

 

 

 

How to Create Downloadable Links to Give Away Books from your Newsletter Sign Up by @JoRobinson176

Most Indie authors at some point on their journeys will set up a newsletter to send to their readers. This is a great way to connect in a personal way, announce events, giveaways, or new books. You can sign up with Mailchimp for free, and it’s very user friendly. Sending out a newsletter is like having your own mini magazine. You can share anything you like. I write in multiple genres, so mine is easy to come up with content. Even if you only write in one particular genre you can still share your opinions, information you find interesting, as well as personal things about yourself and your interests. And of course – your books. A great way to get readers to subscribe is to offer them a freebie. As an author that’s easy – give them a book. You can either write a short story specifically to give away on your newsletter, or you can give them one of your novels or the first in a series.

Bearing in mind that PDF books make work for pirates easy, be very sure that you’re comfortable with your choice of freebie. For me personally, the first book in my Shadow People series is already widely pirated, so that’s the one available for free download when anyone signs up for my newsletter. If it’s going to be tossed around for free, then I prefer to be the one doing the tossing. It’s not difficult to set up. Here’s how you do it.

First have your completed manuscript ready. Add your completed cover in high definition by using the Insert > Picture function on Word on the first page. Then make sure that you’re easy to find by adding hyperlinks which are clickable from PDF to your other books, website, or any other place that you’d like readers to find you.

1 - Hyperlinks in PDF

Save As a PDF file. Then head off to your WordPress site, and click Add New from the Media section on your dashboard.

1 - Media

Select your PDF file, and wait for it to load completely. Then hit the edit button and copy the URL address. You can use this address anywhere you like to make your book available for free download.

1 - Select
1 - Upload
1 - Copy Url

Next zoom on over to Mailchimp and add it to your subscription confirmation thank you email. Just type the text that you want to appear above the link – Click Here To Download, for example, then click on the link icon at the top of the page and paste in your book URL. This is what it will look like.

1 - Final Look

Have fun building your newsletter, and don’t forget to add an invitation to subscribe on your blog and website.

Five Great Quotes by Stan “The Man” Lee.

 stan-lee
How would you like to write books every month that sold hundreds of thousands every time? Meet Stan Lee. Yes, some of you are turning your noses up at comicbooks. Yes, I spelled it comicbooks because Stan Lee says so. Because of Marvel comics I learned how to read and sound out long words. Amazing to some people. The books weren’t just filled with pow, bang, zip. With scientists on the scene they had to talk like they were scientists and part of Stan’s theory of comicbooks was and is to keep the people real even if they were super powered beings. For a genre to still be going strong and having mega hits every decade in the movies and on TV there must be something to it. Here are Five great quotes from Stan “The Man” Lee.

“Everybody wants to feel that you’re writing to a certain demographic because that’s good business, but I’ve never done that … I tried to write stories that would interest me. I’d say, what would I like to read?… I don’t think you can do your best work if you’re writing for somebody else, because you never know what that somebody else really thinks or wants.

“Some people will say, “Why read a comic book? It stifles the imagination. If you read a novel you imagine what people are like. If you read a comic, it’s showing you.” The only answer I can give is, “You can read a Shakespeare play, but does that mean you wouldn’t want to see it on the stage?”

“Achilles, without his heel, you wouldn’t even know his name today.”

“If you’re writing about a character, if he’s a powerful character, unless you give him vulnerability I don’t think he’ll be as interesting to the reader.”

“I’m very proud of being a hack. It’s why I’ve lived as long as I have, I think.”

A three page layout from the Fantastic Four.

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A panel from the X-Men.

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And one of the pivotal moments in comicbooks.

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@RonovanWrites

 

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© Copyright-All rights reserved by litworldinterviews.wordpress.com 2015

 

Are you an Author or a Writer? by @RobertHughes05

I was recently asked this question and had no hesitation in answering it.

“Why did you give that answer?” was the next question.

Although I had given an answer, the person asking me the questions went away not fully convinced I had answered their questions correctly.

Later that evening, while laying in bed and not able to get to sleep, the question kept going round and round in my head.  ‘Am I an author or a writer?’

When asked the question, earlier that day, my answer was that I was a writer. When asked why I was not an author, I put it down to the fact that I have never had a book published.  I’ve written quite a few short stories and am in the process of writing a book, but I have only ever published my short stories on my blog. Doesn’t that then mean that I am a writer, and not an author?

I’ve asked the same question to a few people who I know enjoy writing and those that have had books published declared themselves as authors, whereas most of those that have written, but never had anything published in a book, declared themselves as writers.  So I thought my argument was won and that I had answered the question correctly.  Then somebody mentioned to me that I should consider myself as a ‘trainee author’, which I guess I am because I want to have my stories published in a book one day, but the word ‘author’ still means something completely different to me, even with the word ‘trainee’ in front of it.

I suppose just about every human being in this world of ours is a writer.  Whether they write a letter, an email, a shopping list, or a greeting card, they’re actually writing, which makes them a writer.  However, if I look at it another way, writing a letter, an email, shopping list, or a greeting card is not being creative, is it?  So, maybe the word writer can mean lots of different things?

If asked, I’ll never answer that I am an author, because I don’t believe I am.  Yes, I have a number of short stories under my belt which have been published on my blog, but that does not make me an author.  Not just yet anyway.  If I go ahead and have those short stories published in a book then I would gladly answer that I am an author but, until I do so, as far as I am concerned I am a writer…for now.

Here’s something else to throw on the fire.  Having written this article, can I now consider myself as the author of it?  Does that mean I am, after all, an author? Am I digging myself into a very deep hole here or is there a simple answer to the question ‘am I an author or a writer?’

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@RobertHughes05 (https://twitter.com/RobertHughes05)

hughsviewsandnews.com (http://hughsviewsandnews.com/about/)

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